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INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER IN 1841 


CALENDAR 

OF 

The Faculty of Medicine 


EIGHTY-THIRD SESSION 
1935-36 


PRINTED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY THE JACKSON PRESS 
KINGSTON 

1935 


CONTENTS 


Calendar 

Plan of the University Grounds . 

Academic Year 

Time Tables 

History of the University 

Government and Administration , 

Officers of Administration 

Officers of Instruction 

Other Officers 

Equipment and Special Facilities 

Medical Buildings 

Laboratories 

Hospitals 

Museum . . 

Medical Library 

University Library 

General Information 

Admission of Students 

Matriculation Examinations . . 


Page 

4 

5 

5 

6 

. 10 
. 13 
. 16 
. 21 
. 26 
. 27 
. 27 
. 27 
. 28 
. .29 
. 29 
. 29 
. 31 
. 31 
. 32 


Registration 


33 


Fraternities . 


33 


Curriculum 33 

Examinations and Graduation 34 

Fees 36 

Average Cost per Session 36 

Microscopes 37 

Physical Welfare of Students 37 

Student Advisers 38 

The Alma Mater and -Ssculapian Societies 38 

Officers’ Training Corps 39 

Higher Degrees 40 

Degree of Doctor of Science (D.Sc.) 40 

Diploma of Public Health (D.P.H.) 40 

Scholarships and Honours 42 

Requirements for License 49 

Courses of Instruction 51 

Degrees Conferred 70 

Medalists and Holders of Scholarships 71 


Students in Attendance 


73 


CALENDAR 

1935 


JANUARY 



FEBRUARY 




MARCH 





APRIL 



s 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

c 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

s 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 






1 

2 






1 

2 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 



24 

25 

26 

27 

28 



24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

28 

29 

30 



















31 
















MAY 





JUNE 





JULY 





AUGUST 



S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 




1 

2 

3 

4 







1 


1 

2 

3 

4 

6 

c 





1 

2 

3 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

2 

3 

4 

5 

8 

7 

8 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

4 

5 

3 

7 

8 

9 

10 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

1. 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 


23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

28 

29 

30 

31 




25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 








30 






















SEPTEMBER 




OCTOBER 



NOVEMBER 



DECEMBER 


S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

s 

1 

2 

3 

4 

6 

6 

7 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 






1 

2 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

16 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

13 

14 

16 

16 

17 

18 

19 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28* 

29 

30 

, . 





27 

28 

29 

30 

31 



24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

29 

30 

31 





1936 


JANUARY 



FEBRUARY 




MARCH 





APRIL 



s 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 




1 

2 

3 

4 







1 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 




1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 


23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

29 

30 

31 





26 

27 

28 

29 

30 





MAY 





JUNE 





JULY 





AUGUST 



S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 






1 

2 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 




1 

2 

3 

4 







1 

3 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

2 

3 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

28 

29 

30 





26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 


23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

31 





















30 

31 







SEPTEMBER 



OCTOBER 



NOVEMBER 



DECEMBER 


S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

s 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 





1 

2 

3 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 




25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

29 

30 






27 

28 

29 

30 

31 





BUILDINGS OF QUEEN’S UNIVERSITY 


BARRIE 


PLAN OP QUEEN’S UNIVERSITY GROUNDS 


1. Central Heating Plant. 

2. Commerce Building. 

3. Observatory. 

4. Ban High Hall. 

6. Theological Hall. 

6. Principal’s Residence. 

7. Old Medical Building. 

8. Hydraulics Laboratory. 

9. Medical Laboratories Building. 

10. Jock Harty Arena. 


11. Carruther’s Hall. 

12. Fleming Hall. 

13. Storehouse. 

14. Mechanical Laboratory. 

15. Nicol Hall. 

16. Gordon Hall. 

17. Douglas Library. 

18. Ontario Hall. 

19. Grant Ha)l. 

20. Kingston Hall. 


21. Richardson Stadium. 

22. Leonard Field. 

23. Kingston General Hospital 
and Richardson Laboratory. 

24. Miller Hall. 

25. Gymnasium. 

26. Students' Memorial Union. 

27. Gordon House. 

28. Goodwin House. 

29. Macdonnell House. 


ACADEMIC YEAR 


Aug. 31, 

Sept. 23, 
Sept. 25, 

Sept. 26, 
Oct. 5, 
Dec. 20, 

Jan. 3, 
Mar. 15, 
Ap^\ 5, 
Apr. 9, 
Apr. 15, 
May 1, 
May 2, 
May 6, 

May 20, 


EIGHTY-THIRD SESSION 

1935 

Saturday — Last day for filing notice (accompanied by fee) of 
intention to write supplementary examinations. 

Monday — Registration begins. 

Wednesday — Last day for registration without payment of 
late registration fee. 

Thursday — Classes open at 9 a.m. 

Saturday — Last day for registration. 

Friday — Christmas holidays begin at noon. 

1936 

Friday — Classes re-open at 9 a.m. 

Last day for payment of graduation fees. 

Sunday — Lister Day. 

Thursday — Easter Recess begins at 5 p.m. 

Wednesday — Classes re-open at 9 a.m. 

Friday — Classes close at 4 p.m. 

Saturday — Final examinations begin. 

Wed7iesday — University Convocation for Conferring Degrees 
upon graduates of the Faculties of Arts and 
Science. (This date is provisional). 

Wednesday — Medical Convocation for conferring degrees and 
announcing honours. 


TIME TABLE FOR FIRST YEAR 

Hours Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 


— 6 — 



TIME TABLE FOR THIRD YEAR 

Hours Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 


7 - 



TIME TABLE FOR FIFTH YEAR 

Mo nday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 


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SUPPLEMENTAL EXAMINATIONS 
September, 1935 

These examinations will be held during: the week beginning Monday, 
September 17. The precise dates will be arranged later. 


MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS 
May, 1936 


Written Examinations 


Saturday, May 2nd 
Monday, May Uth 

Tuesday, May 5th 
Wednesday, May 6th 

Thursday, May 7th 

Friday, May 8 th 

Saturday, May 9th 

Monday, May 11th 

Tuesday, May 12th 
Wednesday, May 13 th 


9 a.m. 

Psychology (2nd) 
Obstetrics (5th) 
General Biology (1st) 
Chemistry (2nd) 
Medicine (Gth) 

Medicine (5th) 
Obstetrics (Gth) 
Chemistry (1st) 
Physiology (3rd) 
Gynaecology (Gth) 
Histology (2nd) 
Applied Anatomy (4th) 

Eye, Ear, Nose and 
Throat (5th) 

Physics (1st) 

Chemistry (3rd) 
Pathology (5th) 

Public Health and 
Prev. Medicine (Gth) 
Anatomy (2nd) 
Histology (3rd) 
Sur^ry (5th) 

Pediatrics (5th) 

Applied Anatomy (5th) 


2 p.m. 


Anatomy (3rd) 
Pathology (4th) 
Therapeutics (5th) 
Physics (2nd) 

Surgery (4th) 

CONVOCATION 

Bacteriology (3rd) 
Gynaecology (5th) 
Surgery (6th) 
Emb^ryology (2nd) 
Medicine (4th) 

Pathological Chemistry 
(4th) 


Pharmacology (4th) 


Bacteriology (4th) 


Clinical, oral and practical examinations are arranged by the Professors 
concerned. 


— 9 — 


HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 


Queen’s University owes its origin to the desire of the Synod of 
the Presbyterian Church in Canada in connection with the Church of 
Scotland for a ministry trained within the country. As early as 1832 
the Provincial Government had been petitioned “to endow without delay 
an institution, or professorships, for the education and training of 
young men for the ministry in connection with the Synod.” This and 
other representations failing of their object, steps were taken by the 
Synod to found a college at Kingston on the lines of the Scottish Na- 
tional Universities. On October 16th, 1841, a Royal Charter was issued 
by Her Majesty Queen Victoria for the establishment of Queen’s Col- 
lege, Kingston, and the first classes were opened in March, 1842, with 
the Rev. Dr. Liddell as Principal. Funds were provided in part by 
grants from the Presbyterian Church in Scotland, and from the Cana- 
dian Government, and in part by liberal subscriptions from the friends 
of the young and growing University. In 1867-68 the withdrawal of 
the Provincial grant, and the failure of the Commercial Bank, which 
swept away the greater part of the endowment, almost brought financial 
disaster. But the crisis was met by the determination of Principal 
Snodgrass and of other self-denying workers chief among whom was 
Professor Mackerras. The country was canvassed for subscriptions, 
and as a result of the widespread interest aroused, $113,000 was added 
to the endowment. 

In 1877 Principal Snodgrass was succeeded by the Rev. G. M. 
Grant who for a quarter of a century built with brilliant success upon 
the foundation laid by his predecessors. Under his guidance the Uni- 
versity gained rapidly in size and prestige. In 1887, as the result of 
an effort in commemoration of the Queen's Jubilee, $250,000 was raised, 
resulting in further extension, and in the establishment of new pro 
fessorships. 

Principal Grant died in 1902, and was succeeded in the following 
year by the Very Rev. D. M. Gordon. In 1916, owing to ill-health, 
Principal Gordon resigned his position but continued in office until the 
autumn of 1917, when the Rev. R. Bruce Taylor was appointed as his 
successor. In 1930 Principal Taylor resigned his position and went 
abroad to live, and Dr. J. C. Connell was appointed Acting-Principal 
until a new Principal should be found. In October, W. Hamilton Fyfe, 
Head of Christ’s Hospital, England, and formerly Fellow of Merton 
College, Oxford, was installed as Principal. 


— 10 — 


— 11 - 


In 1854 the Medical Faculty of Queen’s was established. It was 
reorganized in 1865 as the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons in 
affiliation with the University, but in 1891 the original status was re- 
sumed. 

Queen’s led the way in co-education. As early as 1870 special 
classes in English and other subjects were formed for women, but 
courses leading to a degree were not thrown open to them until 1878-79. 
In 1880 co-education was extended to the medical course, and in 1883 
a separate Women’s Medical College was opened and affiliated with 
Queen’s. It was closed, however, in 1894, as similar facilities were 
offered in Toronto and elsewhere. 

In 1907 the Ontario Government established at Queen’s a Faculty of 
Education for the purpose of providing professional training for teach- 
ers in the secondary schools of the Province. In 1920, however, the work 
of the Faculty was discontinued because of the decision of the Govern- 
ment to extend the scope of the Normal Schools and to create in Toronto 
the Ontario College for Teachers. 

The School of Mining was founded in 1893 under an Ontario charter 
and for several sessions all its departments were housed in Carruthers 
Hall, erected in 1889. The Provincial Legislature in 1900 provided 
Ontario Hall for the Departments of Physics, Geology and Min- 
eralogy, and Fleming Hall for the Departments of Civil, Mechanical, 
and Electrical Engineering. In 1911 the Provincial Government 
erected Gordon Hall, which is entirely used by the Department of Chem- 
istry, and, through the generosity of the late Professor Nicol and other 
graduates, Nicol Hall was built to provide class rooms and laboratories 
for the Department of Mining and Metallurgy. The School of Mining 
was amalgamated with the University in 1916 and now constitutes its 
Faculty of Applied Science. 

The endowment of the University is at present about $2,450,000, 
of which about $900,000 was obtained in 1918-19. To this sum the late 
Chancellor Dr. Douglas contributed $500,000 and the Carnegie Corpora- 
tion $250,000. In recent years the Province of Ontario has steadily 
increased its grants, and the annual income of the University, derived 
from all sources, is now over $500,000. 

There is now on the University Campus a stately group of build- 
ings, comprising the Old Arts Building (now the Theological Building), 
Carruthers Hall (Civil Engineering) ; Kingston Hall (Arts) the gift 
of the city of Kingston ; Grant Hall, erected by the students to the mem- 
ory of the late Principal Grant; Ontario Hall (Physics) ; Fleming Hall 
(Mechanical and Electrical Engineering) ; Gordon Hall (Chemistry) ; 


12 — 


Nicol Hall (Metallurgy) ; the Medical Building (Anatomy, Pharmacology, 
and Preventive Medicine); the Medical Laboratories Building; the New 
Gymnasium; Miller Hall (Geology and Mineralogy), named in memory 
of the late Dr. W. G. Miller; the Observatory; and the Douglas Memorial 
Library. 

Queen’s University, though founded by a Church, was dedicated to 
the nation. As its constituency expanded, its constitution was 
gradually broadened until finally in 1912, as a result of an amicable 
arrangement between the Presbyterian Church and the trustees of the 
University, an act was passed by the Dominion Parliament removing 
the last vestige of denominational control. The registration of students 
has grown from 665 in 1900 to over 3,800 in the present session, and 
Queen’s has become nation-wide in its work and influence. 


GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 


The administration of the University is vested in the Board of Trus- 
tees, the University Council, the Senate, and the Faculty Boards. 

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

The Board of Trustees consists of the Chancellor, the Principal, and 
the Rector; one representative from each affiliated college; representa- 
tives as provided for by the Statutes from the University Council, the 
Benefactors, the Graduates; and members elected by the Board of 
Trustees. 

The functions of the Board of Trustees are to manage the finances, 
to possess and care for the property, to procure legislation, to appoint 
instructors and other officers, and in general to attend to such external 
matters as do not relate directly to instruction. 

THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

The University Council consists of the Chancellor, the Trustees, the 
members of the Senate, and an equal number of members elected by the 
Graduates from their own numbers. 

The annual meeting of the Council is held on the Tuesday immedi- 
ately preceding the Spring Convocation. 

The functions of the Council are; 

(1) To elect the Chancellor, except when two or more candidates 
are nominated, in which case the election is by registered graduates. 

(2) To elect six trustees, two of whom shall retire annually. 

(3) To make by-laws governing the election of the Rector by the 
registered students, of seven trustees by the benefactors, of six trustees 
by the University Council, and of six trustees by the graduates. 

(4) To discuss all questions relating to the University and its 
welfare. 

(5) To make representation of its views to the Senate or the Board 
of Trustees. 

(6) To decide on proposals for affiliation. 


— 13 — 


— 14 — 


(7) To arrange all matters pertaining to (a) its own meetings and 
business, (b) the meetings and proceedings of Convocation, (c) the in- 
stallation of the Chancellor, (d) the fees for memberships, registration 
and voting. 

THE SENATE 


The Senate consists of: 

The Principal. 

Vice-Principal. 

The Principal of Queen’s Theological College. 

The Dean of the Faculty of Arts. 

The Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. 

The Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science. 

Three Professors elected by the Faculty of Arts. 

Three Professors elected by the Faculty of Medicine. 

Three Professors elected by the Faculty of Applied Science. 

Two Professors elected by the Faculty of Queen’s Theological 
College. 

The functions of the Senate are: 

(1) To determine all matters of an academic character which con- 
cern the University as a whole. 

(2) To consider and determine all courses of study leading to a de- 
gree, including conditions of Matriculation, on recommendation of the 
respective Faculty Boards; but the Senate shall not embody any 
changes without having previously presented these to the Faculty. 

(3) To recommend to the Board of Trustees the establishment of 
any additional Faculty, Department, Chair or Course of Instruction in 
the University. 

(4) To be the medium of communication between the Alma Mater 
Society and the Governing Boards. 

(5) To determine all regulations regarding the social functions 
of the students within the University, and regarding the University 
Library and University Reading Rooms. 

(6) To publish the University Calendars. 

(7) To conduct examinations. 

(8) To grant Degrees. 

(9) To award University Scholarships, Medals, and Prizes. 


—15— 


(10) To enforce the Statutes, Rules, and Ordinances of the Univer- 
sity. 

(11) To make such recommendations to the Governing Boards as 
may be deemed expedient for promoting the interests of the University. 

THE FACULTY BOARD 

The Dean, Professors, Associate Professors, and Assistant Profes- 
sors, have pow;er to meet as a separate board, and to administer the 
affairs of the Faculty under such regulations as the Board of Trustees 
may prescribe. The Principal and Vice-Principal are members of the 
Faculty Board, of which the Principal is ex-officio president. 

The functions of the Faculty Board are : 

(1) To recommend to the Senate courses of study leading to a de- 
gree, and the conditions of admission. 

(2) To decide upon applications for admission or for change of 
course, subject to the regulations of the Senate. 

(3) To submit to the Senate names for both ordinary and honorar.v 
degrees. 

(4) To arrange the time-table for classes and to edit the Faculty 
Calendar, subject to the approval of the Senate. 

(5) To control registration, and determine the amount of fees and 
manner of payment, subject to the regulations of the Senate. 

(6) To deal with class failures. 

(7) To exercise academic supervision over students. 

(8) To make such recommendations to the Senate as may be 
deemed expedient for promoting the efficiency of the University. 

(9) To award Faculty Scholarships, Medals, and Prizes. 

(10) To appoint such sessional assistants, fellows, tutors, and de- 

monstrators as shall be needed to give instruction in the subjects taught 
by the Faculty. _ 

(11) To pass such regulations and by-laws as may be necessary for 
the exercise of the functions of the Faculty. 


OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 


CHANCELLOR 

James Richardson, B.A., LL.D. 

PRINCIPAL AND VICE-CHANCELLOR 
W. Hamilton Fyfe, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S.C 

RECTOR 

Rt. Hon. R. B. Bennett, P.C., LL.D. 

VICE-PRINCIPAL AND TREASURER 
W. E. McNeill, M.A., Ph.D., D.C.L. 

REGISTRAR 

Jean I. Royce, B.A. 


THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Chairman 

J. M. Macdonnell, M.A. 

Secretary 

W. E. McNeill, M.A., Ph.D., D.C.L. 

Ex-Officio Members 

James Richardson, B.A., LL.D Chancellor 

W. Hamilton Fyfe, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S.C Principal 

Rt. Hon. R. B. Bennett, P.C., LL.D Rector 

Elective Members 
Retire 1935 

John Irwin, Esq.^ Montreal 

A. J. Meiklejohn, B.A. 6 Kingston 

Mrs. George Ross, B.A.^ Toronto 

Elmer Davis, Esq.^ Kingston 


— 16 — 


— 17 — 


Retire 1936 

Jackson Booth, Esq^ Ottawa 

E. A. Collins, B.Sc.^ Copper Cliff 

R. Crawford, B.A> Kingston 

Dennis Jordan, M.D., C.M.® Toronto 

Judge H. A. Lavell, B.A.3 Kingston 

J. M. Macdonnell, M.A.7 Toronto 

Rev. Leslie Pidgeon, B.A., D.D.^ Montreal 

Senator A. C. Hardy, B.A., LL.B., P.C., K.C.*^ Brockville 

Senator H. H. Horsey, B.A.^ Ottawa 

D. H. Laird, M.A., K.C.^ Winnipeg, Man. 

Retire 1937 

William Curle, M.A., K.C.g Montreal, P.Q. 

J. G. Dwyer, M.D., C.M., LL.D.e New York City 

T. A. McGinnis, B.Sc. 2 Kingston 

D. I. McLeod, B.A.® Toronto 

W. C. Clark, M.A.^ Ottawa 

Alexander Longwell, B.A., B.Sc.i Toronto 

J. C. MacFarlane, Esq., M.A., K.C.^ Toronto 

Miss Charlotte E. Whitton, C.B.E., M.A.^ Ottawa 

Retire 1938 

J. M. Campbell, Esq."^ Kingston 

V. K. Greer, M.A.^ Toronto 

O. D. Skelton, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., F.R.S.C.- Ottawa 

G. C. Bateman, B.Sc.^ Toronto 

T. H. Farrell, M.A., M.D., C.M.^ Utica, N.Y. 

Retire 1939 

G. F. Henderson, B.A., K.C.- Ottawa 


^Elected by the University Council for three years. 

^Elected by the Benefactors for four years. 

^Elected by the Graduates for three years. 

^Elected by the Board of Trustees to represent the Faculty of Applied 
Science for three years. 

“Elected by the Faculty of Queen’s Theological College for one year. 
^Elected by the Board of Trustees for four years. 

'Elected by Benefactors to represent the Faculty of Applied Science 
for three years. 


THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 


Secretary 

Gordon J. Smith, B.A., B.Sc. 

Ex-officio Members 

The Chancellor 
The Principal 

The Members of the Board of Trustees 
The Members of the Senate 

Elective Meinhers 
Retire 1936 

Rev. Eber Crummy, M.A., B.Sc., Ph.D., D.D Victoria 

J. E. S. Dunlop, B,A W^innipog' 

W. R. Jafprey, M.B Hamilton 

^Alexander Longwell, B.A., B.Sc Toronto 

J. A. MacGregor, M.D., C.M New York City 

R. K. Patterson, M.D., C.M Ottawa 

Miss Marion Redden, B.A Kingston 

G. J. Smith, B.A., B.Sc Kingston 

Judge M. B. Tudhope, B.A Brockville 

Retire 1937 

*G. C. Bateman, B.Sc Toronto 

A. E. Day, M.A., K.C Kingston 

W. C. Dowsley, M.A. Brockville 

W. S. Kirkland, M.A., LL.D Toronto 

Mrs. H. a. Lavell, B.A Kingston 

C. B. Macartney, M.D., C.M Thorold 

Rev. j. Y. McKinnon, M.A., B.D Brantford 

Mrs. Etta Newlands, M.A. Tarrytown, N.Y. 

J. M. Young, B.A., M.D., C.M Walkerville 

Retire 1938 

E. T. Corkill, B.Sc., M.E Toronto 

C. W. Drury, B.Sc., Ph.D Toronto 

Judge A. G. Farrell, B.A Regina 

R. D. Harkness, B.Sc Montreal 

*J. C. MacFarlane, M.A., K.C L Toronto 

W. S. Murphy, B.A., M.D., C.M Smith’s Falls 

W. A. Newman, B.Sc Montreal 

Edward Ryan, B.A., M.D., C.M Kingston 

T. F. Sutherland, B.Sc Toronto 


— 18 — 


19— 


Retire 1939 

R. W. Anglin, M.A 

D. D. Calvin, B.A 

*T. H. Farrell, M.A., M.D., C.M 

* Senator H. H. Horsey, B.A 

Francis King, M.A., K.C 

*D. H. Laird, M.A., K.C 

A. E. MacRae, B.Sc, 

W. F. Nickle, B.A., K.C ' 

Mrs. G. S. Silverthorn, B.A., M.D., C.M. 


. . . Toronto 
. . . Toronto 
Utica, N.Y. 
. . . . Ottawa 
. . Kingston 
. Winnipeg 
. . . Ottawa 
. . . Kingston 
. . . Toronto 


Retire 19^0 


J. A. Bannister, B.A., D.Paed Peterborough 

R. W. Brock, M.A., LL.D Vancouver 

C. W. Greenland, B.Sc Kingston 

Campbell Laidlaw, B.A., M.D., C.M Ottawa 

E. L. Longmore, B.Sc Timmins 

G. S. Otto, M.A Hamilton 

L. A. Pierce, B.A., S.T.D., LL.D., D.Litt Toronto 

Mrs. R. 0. Sweezey, B.A Montreal 

James Wallace, M.A., B.D., M.D., C.M New York City 


Retire 19U 


J. C. Elliott, M.A Toronto 

R. M. Smith, B.Sc Toronto 

J. F. Houston, M.D., C.M Hamilton 

A. G. MacLachlan, B.Sc Kingston 

G. C. Monture, B.Sc Ottawa 

Rev. N. M. Leckie, B.A., B.D., D.D Turnerville 

A. A. MacKay, B.Sc Montreal 

G. G. McNab, M.A., D.Paed Guelph 

N. B. Wormith, M.A Toronto 


*Elected by the Council as their representatives on the Board of 
Trustees. 


THE SENATE 


Ex-officio Members 

W. Hamilton Fyfe, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S.C Principal 

W. E. McNeill, M.A,. Ph.D., D.C.L Vice-Principal 

John Matheson, M.A Dean of the Faculty of Arts 

A. L. Clark, B.Sc., Ph.D Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science 

Frederick Etherington, M.D., C.M.G., Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 
Rev. H. a. Kent, M.A., D.D., F.R.S.A., Principal of Queen’s 

Theological College 


Elective Members 


The Faculty of Arts 

H. L. Tracy, B.A., Ph.D Retires 1936 

J. A. Gray, O.B.E., D.Sc., F.R.S.C., F.R.S Retires 1937 

W. A. Mackintosh, M.A., Ph.D., F.R.S.C. Retires 1938 

The Faculty of Applied Science 

J. E. Havfley, M.A., Ph.D Retires 1936 

A. Macphail, C.M.G., D.S.O., B.Sc., LL.D Retires 1937 

J. A. McRae, M.A., F.I.C Retires 1938 

The Faculty of Medicine 

Bruce H. Hopkins, M.D Retires 1936 

G. Spencer Melvin, M.D Retires 1936 

J. F. Sparks, M.D Retires 1936 

The Faculty of Queen’s Theological College 

Rev. j. R. Watts, B.A., D.D Retires 1936 

Rev. j. M. Shaw, M.A., D.D Retires 1937 


A. P. Knight, M.A., M.D. (Toronto), F.R.S.C. 

Emeritus Professor of Physiology 

Queen’s Crescent 


— 20 — 


OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 


Frederick Etherington, M.D., F.R.C.S. (C.) , C.M.G., 

Associate Professor of Surgery and Dean of the Faculty 

118 University Avenue 

L. J. Austin, M.Ch. (Cantab.), F.R.C.S. (Eng.), F.R.C.S. (C.) , 
Professor of Surgery 


W. T. Connell, M.D., F.R.C.P.(C), 

122 Union Street West 


Professor of Medicine and Clinical Medicine 

11 Arch Street 

G. S. Melvin, M.D. (Aberdeen), 


Professor of Physiology 

127 King Street West 


Tames Miller, B.Sc., M.D. (Edinburgh), D.Sc. (Birmingham), 


F.R.C.P.Ed., F.R.C.P. (C.), F.R.S.C. 
Professor of Pathology 

91 Albert Street 


G. W. Mylks, M.D., F.A.C.S., F.R.C.S. (C.) , 

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 

122 Wellington Street 

G. B. Reed, B.Sc., Ph.D. (Harvard), F.R.S.C., 

Professor of Bacteriology 

218 Albert Street 

Thos. Gibson, M.A., M.B. (Edinburgh), F.R.C.P. (C.) , 

Professor of Pharmmcology and They'apeutics 

82 Beverly Street 


R. R. MacGregor, M.D., C.M., F.R.C.P. (C.) , 
Professor of Pediatrics 

148 Earl Street 

D. C. Matheson, M.B., 

Professor of Anatomy 

Union Street West 


John Wyllie, M.A., M.B., Ch.B., B.Sc. (Glasgow), D.P.H. (Camb.) 

The Arthur R. Elliott Professor of Public Health and 
Preventive Medicine 



22 Barrie Street 

—21— 



— 22 — 


F. A. Cays, M.D., C.M., F.R.C.S. (C.) , 


Professor of Oto-laryngology 

124 Wellington Street 

T. D. Cumberland, M.B. (Toronto) 

Professor of Psychiatry 

Ontario Hospital 


W. A. Jones, M.D. (Western), F.R.C.P. (C.) , 

Professor of Radiology and Physical Therapy 

251 University Avenue 


J. K. Robertson, M.A., (Toronto), F.R.S.C., 
Professor of Physics 

105 Albert Street 

I. G. Bogart, M.D., C.M., F.R.C.S. (C), 

Associate Professor of Surgery 

G. H. Ettinger, B.A., M.D., 

102 Wellington Street 


Associate Professor of Physiology and Lecturer 
in Embryology 



67 Alice Street 

Wm. Gibson, M.D., F.R.C.P. (C.), 

Associate Professor of Medicine 

85 William Street 

J. F. Logan, M.A., Ph.D., 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Union St. West 


C. E. O’Connor, M.D., C.M. 

Associate Professor of Ophthahnology and Oto-laryngology 

277 King Street 

J. F. Sparks, B.A., M.D., C.M., F.R.C.S. (C.) , 

Associate Professor of Surgery and Applied Anatomy 

100 Wellington Street 

N. E. Berry, M.D., C.M. 

Assistant Professor of Surgery in charge of Urology 

Queen’s Crescent 

Hendry C. Connell, B.A., M.D., C.M., 

Assistant Professor in Oto-laryngology 


265 King Street 


—23— 


R. L. Dorrance, M.A. (Toronto) 


Assistant Professor in Chemistry 

602 Earl Street 


H. P. Folger, B.A., M.D., C.M., 

Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology 

238 Bagot Street 


W. D. Hay, M.A., M.D., C.M., 

Assistant Professor in Pathology 

Bruce H. Hopkins, M.B. (Toronto), 

Assistant Professor in Medicine 

124 Beverly Street 


95 King Street East 

S. W. Houston, M.D,, C.M., F.R.C.S.(Edin.), F.R.C.S. (C.) , 

Assistant Professor of Surgery and Demonstrator in 
Anatomy 

81 Clergy Street W. 

S. J. Keyes, M.D., C.M., F.R.C.S. (C.) , 

Assistant Professor of Surgery and Lecturer in Anesthetics 

255 Queen Street 

P. A. McLeod, B.A., M.D., C.M., 

Assistant Professor of Gynaecology and Obstetrics 



40 William Street 

F. J. O’Connor, M.D., C.M., 

Assistant Professor of Obstetrics 

193 Earl Street 

J. H. Orr, M.D., C.M., F.R.C.P.(C.), 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 

529 Johnson Street 

C. R. Salsbury, M.D., C.M., 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

Sydenham Street 


D. W. Boucher, M.D., C.M., F.R.C.S. (Edin.), 

Lecturer in Surgery and Clinical Assistant in 
Anaesthetics 


Eldon M. Boyd, M.A., M.D., C.M., 

Lectuy'er in Pharmacology 

574 Union Street 


261 University Avenue 


■24— 


W, Ford Connell, M.D., C.M., M.R.C.P. (London), 

Lecturer in Medicine 

115 Earl Street 

C. M. Crawford, B.A., M.D., C.M., F.A.C.P., 

Lecturer in Psychology and Psychopathology 

Ontario Hospital 

J. S. Delahaye, M.D., C.M., 

Lecturer in Preventive Medicine, Clinical Assistant in 
Medicine and Demonstrator in Anatomy 

230 Johnson Street 


E. E. Duthie, M.A., 

Lecturer in English 

Gleb Krotkov, B.Sc. (Prague), M.A. (Toronto), 
Lecturer in Biology 

Brock Street Apts. 


37 Traymore Avenue 

P. M. Macdonnell, M.A., M.D., C.M., 

Lecturer in Medical Jurisprudence, and Historian 

Cor. Johnson and Sydenham Sts. 


T. J. Rigney, B.A., K.C., City Solicitor, 

Lecturer in Medical Jurisprudence 

89 Clarence Street 

B. W. Sargent, M.A., Ph.D. (Camb.) , 

Lecturer in Physics 

313 Brock Street 

J. Reginald Third, B.A., M.D., C.M., 

Lecturer in Medicine 

Wellington Street 

C. W. Bennett, M.D., C.M., 

Clinical Assistant in Medicine 

197 Queen Street 

C. A. Buck, M.D., C.M., 

Clinical Assistant in Psychiatry 

W. J. Houghtling, M.D., C.M., 

Clinical Assistant in Medicine 

Ontario Hospital 


120 Wellington Street 


—25— 


P. H. Huyck, M.D., 


Clinical Assistant in Obstetrics 

111 Wellington Street 


F. X. O’Connor, M.D., C.M. 

Clinical Assistant in Ophthalmology and Oto-laryngology 

2631/^ King Street 


E. H. Charlesworth, M.A., Ph.D. (Oxon), 
Assistant in Organic Chemistry 

A. B. Smith, B.A., 

K. L. Brunton, 

Assistayits in Biology 

C. W. Clapp, B.Sc., 

Assistayit in Physics 


Chas. D. F. Mundell, M.D., C.M., 

Fellow in Surgery 

78 Barrie Street 

A. E. Harbeson, B.A., M.D., C.M., 

Demonstrator in Anatomy 

142 Wellington Street. 


Gordon Mylks, B.A., M.D., C.M., 

Assistant Curator of Pathological Museum 

122 Wellington Street 

Miss Jessie Gordon, 

Assistant Secretary 


240 Alfred Street 


OTHER OFFICERS 


Librarian 

E. COCKBURN KYTE 
Curators of the Library 

Principal Fyfe, Principal Kent, Vice-Principal McNeill, 

Dean Clark, Dean Etherington, Dean Matheson, 
Professors Macphail, James Miller, Tracy, F. A. Knox, J. M. Shaw 

Curators of the Museums 

The Professors of Biology, Geology and Pathology 

Director of Summer School 
Professor MacClement 

Director of Extension Work 
A. W. Currie, B.A., B.Com. 

Secretary of the General Alumni Association and Manager of the 
Employment Service 

Gordon J. Smith, B.A , B.Sc. 

Medical Oificer 

W. Ford Connell, M.D., M.R.C.P. (Lond.) 

Superintendent of Buildings 
James Bews 

Secretary-Treasurer, Athletic Board of Control 
Chas. C. Hicks 

— 26 — 


EQUIPMENT AND SPECIAL FACILITIES 


THE MEDICAL BUILDINGS 

The Old Medical Building, erected in 1858, was destroyed by fire in 
August, 1924, It has now been replaced by a fire-proof structure, 
which houses the departments of Anatomy, Pharmacology and Preventive 
Medicine. 

In the Medical Laboratories building are conducted the courses in 
Bacteriology, Embryology, Histology, and Physiology. 

The department of Pathology is housed in the new Richardson 
Laboratory, attached to the Clinic building. General Hospital. 

THE LABORATORIES 

THE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORIES 

The classes in the Department of Biology are conducted in new 
quarters in the Old Arts building. The laboratories are equipped with 
the supplies and equipment necessary for the study of plant and animal 
life and are provided with a separate locker for each student. 

The laboratories in Bacteriology are situated on the second and 
third floors of the Medical Laboratories building; that for Experimental 
Physiology occupies the west side of the second floor of the building 
and has all appliances necessary for 50 students working at one time. 
The work in Histology and Embryology is conducted on the west side 
of the first floor, where there is accommodation for 120 students. 

THE CHEMICAL LABORATORIES 

The Chemical Laboratories are in Gordon Hall. 

On the fourth floor are the laboratories of Medical Organic, Bio- 
chemistry, and Water Analysis. On the third floor are two laboratories 
for General Chemistry, and a laboratory for Electrochemistry and Col- 
loid Chemistry. On the second or main floor are two laboratories for 
Quantitative Analysis, two for Organic Chemistry, and one for Indus- 
trial Chemistry. On the first or basement floor are three laboratories 
for Qualitative Analysis, and two for Physical Chemistry. Besides 
these there is a number of small separate laboratories for research work. 


— 27 — 


—28— 


THE PHYSICAL LABORATORIES 

The Physics Laboratories occupy the major part of Ontario Hall. 
The basement contains the large elementary laboratory, the liquid air 
room, numerous research laboratories and the research workshop. The 
main floor is given over to undergraduate lecture and laboratory rooms. 
The second floor has two large lecture rooms, laboratory room for ad- 
vanced undergraduate classes and for research. The attic is used for 
workshop and storage purposes. 


THE HOSPITALS 

The General Hospital affords the main source of clinical teaching, 
its staff being nominated by the Medical Faculty. The Douglas Clinical 
Building completed in the autumn of 1925, houses the Public Wards, 
Operating Theatres, X-ray and Electro-therapeutic Departments, and 
the various out-patient departments. The Nickle Wing has been re- 
modelled for use of the Obstetric Department and is now occupied. 

The Isolation Hospital, erected on the General Hospital grounds, and 
under its administration, will accommodate 64 patients. This Hospital 
affords full opportunity for clinical training in infectious diseases. 

The Hotel Dieu Hospital throws open its wards for clinical teaching.. 
This Hospital has 200 beds and is thoroughly equipped. 

The Ontario Hospital for the Insane is open for the instruction of 
students. The staff of this Hospital are responsible for the teaching in 
Mental Diseases. Its large population affords in addition much material 
for medical, surgical, gynaecological and pathological teaching. 

The Mowat Sanatorium for Tuberculosis having been sold to the 
Ontario Government, is incorporated with the Ontario Hospital for 
the Insane. The Doran Building of the General Hospital has been 
opened as a unit for the care of tuberculosis and will afford ample 
opportunity to the students for clinical teaching in pulmonary diseases, 
and for the study, prevention and treatment of tuberculosis. 

ONTARIO INSTITUTE OF RADIOTHERAPY, KINGSTON 

The Ontario Institute of Radiotherapy of Kingston for the diagno- 
sis and treatment of cancer and allied diseases, is situated in the 
Kingston General Hospital. A special floor of twenty beds is available 
for the accommodation of in-patients. Ward patients are at the dis- 
posal of the consulting and attending staff of the institute for teaching 
purposes. Ward out-patients are also available as clinical material.. 


—29— 


Students will be familiarized with the diagnosis and treatment of all 
types of cancer, and the necessity for early diagnosis and early ade- 
quate treatment will be demonstrated. 

The consulting staff of the institute consists of the heads of the 
departments of Gynaecology, Medicine, Ophthalmology, Otolaryngology, 
Pathology, Physics, Radiology, Surgery and Urology of the Medical 
Faculty. Dr. J. A. Gray, F.R.S., of the Faculty of Science, acts as 
consulting physicist. 

The division of radiology is equipped with latest type of X-ray 
units for both superficial and deep therapy, and with modern radio- 
graphic machines. 

The department has 410 milligrammes of radium for treatment 
purposes and has also available a supply of radium emanation as needed. 

The Institute is a part of the effort of the Ontario Government to 
combat cancer. 

PATHOLOGICAL MUSEUM 

The Pathological Museum contains numerous valuable specimens 
collected both from hospital and private practice. A catalogue has been 
compiled and is accessible for use in study of the specimens. Contribu- 
tions of morbid specimens will be gladly received from practitioners. 

The Museum has recently been considerably enlarged and rear- 
ranged in accordance with the best modern methods. It now contains 
nearly 2,000 specimens, the majority of which are mounted by modern 
methods for preserving colour. 

The Museum is housed in the Richardson Laboratory at the new 
Hospital Building. 


LIBRARY 

The Douglas Library building provides one large reading room, 
three smaller ones, a number of conference rooms, exhibition room and 
offices for the library staff. 

In the main reading room will be found a collection of some 5,000 
volumes of general reference works on open shelves. The main col- 
lection, shelved on five tiers of book-stacks, occupies the centre of the 
building under the main reading room. The general library now in- 
cludes about 160,000 volumes as well as many original manuscripts 
and prints. 


— 30 — 


The system of classification used is that of the Library of Congress. 

Seven hundred and fifty journals and other serials are currently 
received. 

In addition to the general library, there are departmental libraries 
for physics; chemistry; mining and metallurgy; geology and mineralogy; 
civil, mechanical, and electrical engineering; clinical medicine; opthal- 
mology; pathology. 

The Lome Pierce Collection of Canadian Literature is very rich in 
first editions, original manuscripts and rare Canadiana. 

The Shortt-Haydon Collection of portraits and views relating to 
Canada is one of the finest collections of its kind in existence. 

The library oif the Medical Faculty is now located in the Old Arts 
Building, and has its own reading room. It is administered by the staff 
of the general library. 

The John Franklin Kidd Endowment provides for an annual fund 
for the purchase of books in the department of Surgery. These volumes 
are marked by a special book plate and form a valuable section of the 
Library gradually increasing in importance. 


GENERAL INFORMATION 


ADMISSION OF STUDENTS 

The number of students admitted to the classes of the first year is 
limited and prospective matriculants should make formal application 
for admission on forms obtainable from the Secretary of the Faculty. 
These applications should be in the hands of the Secretary not later 
than September 1st. Applicants will be notified of the decision of the 
Committee on Admissions as soon as possible after that date. Only 
under special circumstances will applications be considered after Sep- 
tember 1st. 

Men alone are admitted. 

Matriculation requirements must be completed before admission. 

All Ontario candidates for admission must satisfy the requirements 
for registration with the Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
viz., Pass Matriculation in the following six subjects: 

Latin (Authors and Composition). 

English (Literature and Composition). 

History (Canadian and Ancient). 

Mathematics (Algebra and Geometry), 
and any two of the following: — 

Greek (Authors and Composition). 

German (Authors and Composition). 

French (Authors and Composition). 

[Spanish (Authors and Composition), 

] or, 

[Italian (Authors and Composition). 

[Experimental Science (Physics and Chemistry), 

1 or, 

[Agriculture (Part I and Part II). 

Following the 1st of January, 1936, there will be added to the 
above matriculation requirements the passing of four subjects (eight 
papers) of the Upper School examination. 

The Faculty of Medicine limits first year registration to fifty stu- 
dents. A selection from applicants for admission will be made on the 
basis of their qualifications. Candidates will be required to present 
not only complete Pass Matriculation but in addition Honour Matricu- 
lation in any four subjects. 


— 31 — 


—32— 


Candidates from Provinces of Canada other than Ontario must pre- 
sent certificates of a standard equivalent to that required for students 
froim the Province of Ontario. 

Intending students are reminded that a University degree in Medi- 
cine does not in itself confer the right to practise the profession of 
medicine. In each Province of Canada and in each one of the United 
States the right of licensure is vested in a Licensing Body which has its 
special laws and requirements. In many cases a special standard of gen- 
eral education is insisted upon before beginning the study of medicine. 
In order that disappointment and loss of time may be avoided, the 
University requires students to register with the licensing body of their 
home Province or State before beginning their medical course. 

Full information as to the requirements for registration in the 
various provinces may be obtained from the Registrars of the Provincial 
Medical Boards (see pages 48, 49). 

Prospective matriculants must submit with their applications for 
admission the certificates on which they claim standing. 

Teachers’ examinations are accepted pro tanto in lieu of the Ma- 
triculation Examinations in so far as the subjects correspond. 

Certificates of Matriculation in any University may be accepted 
pro tanto at the discretion of the Faculty. 

A candidate, who in the Faculty of Arts has obtained credit for 
Physics 1, Biology 1 and 2, Chemistry 1 and 2, will be admitted to the 
second year of Medicine. The course in Medicine may thus be com- 
pleted in five years instead of six. 


MATRICULATION EXAMINATIONS 

The Matriculation examinations are conducted for the Universities 
of Ontario by the University Matriculation Board. They are held in 
June of each year at the Universities and at each High School and Col- 
legiate Institute in Ontario and at such other centres as may be ap- 
proved by the Board. 

The Secretary of the University Matriculation Board, J. P. 
Cowles, Esq., Parliament Buildings, Toronto, will furnish, on request, the 
official circular which contains full information concerning dates, fees, 
standards, curriculum, and examination centres. The University also 
publishes an announcement containing all particulars regarding Ma- 
triculation, which may be obtained from the Registrar of the University. 


■33- 


REGISTRATION 

Students not registering in person on or before September 25th, 
must pay the fee for late registration and no student will be allowed to 
register in the Faculty of Medicine after the 5th of October. 

On first registration each student is required to furnish an un- 
mounted finished photograph (2 inches by 3 inches) of head and 
shoulders only. 

At the time of registration, students who claim exemptions must 
present to the Secretary certificates giving an exact statement of the 
exemptions to which they are entitled. 

A student who has attended the course of instruction in any year 
will be required to complete the examinations of that year before he 
will be permitted to register in the succeeding year. 

No student may repeat more than one year during his course with- 
out the permission of the Faculty. 


FRATERNITIES 

By resolution of Senate no student registered with the University 
may form or become a member of any chapter of an externally-affiliated 
fraternity or sorority at or near Kingston. 


CURRICULUM 

Candidates for the degrees of M.D., C.M., must complete a period 
of six years’ study, comprising six sessions of eight months each. 

Regular attendance on full courses of instruction is required in the 
following subjects of study: — 

1st Year: — General Biology, Chemistry, Physics, English. 

2nd Year: — Anatomy, Organic Chemistry, Histology, Embryology, 
Physics, Psychology. 

3rd Year: — Anatomy, Physiology, Physiological Chemistry, Bac- 
teriology. 


—34— 


4th Year: — Pathology, Pharmacology, Applied Anatomy, Surgery, 
Medicine, Clinical Microscopy, Pathological Chemistry. 

5th Year: — Surgery, Medicine (including Therapeutics), Obstetrics, 
Gynaecology, Pathology, Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat, Applied Anatomy, 
Pediatrics, Preventive Medicine, Jurisprudence, Psychopathology. 

6th Year: — Surgery, Medicine, Obstetrics, Gynaecology, Serology 
and Pathology, Preventive Medicine, Psychiatry, Applied Anatomy, 
History of Medicine, Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat, Pediatrics. 

Certificates of attendance on lectures may be accepted from incor- 
porated medical schools in the British Dominions and others recognized 
by British Universities and licensing bodies. Other certificates of at- 
tendance on lectures and examinations may be accepted at the discre- 
tion of the Faculty. 


EXAMINATIONS AND GRADUATION 

Examinations are held in all subjects at the end of the fall term. 

Students in the first three years must attend a minimum of 90 per 
cent., and students in other years a minimum of 80 per cent., of the 
lectures and laboratory exercises in the subjects for which they are 
registered to be admitted to the final examinations in those subjects. 

A minimum of sixty per cent, in each subject is required for a pass. 

The Faculty may at any time either during the term or after the 
close of the term, require any student to withdraw from the Faculty 
of Medicine whose conduct, attendance, work or progress is deemed 
unsatisfactory. 

Candidates who pass in a majority of the subjects required at the 
annual examinations at the end of the First, Second and Third years 
and in all but three subjects at the end of the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth 
years, may present themselves at the supplemental examinations next 
ensuing in the subjects in which they fail. On passing such examina- 
tions they will be allowed their year. 

A candidate will not be admitted to an examination unless he has 
paid all University fees. ^ 


—35— 


Examinations 

Examinations are required at the end of every session as follows: 

At the end of the first session: — 

General Biology, Chemistry, Physics, English. 

At the end of the second session: — 

Anatomy, Organic Chemistry, Physics, Histology, Embryology, Psy- 
chology. 

At the end of the third session: — 

Anatomy, Physiology, Physiological Chemistry, Bacteriology. 

At the end of the fourth session: — 

Pathology, Pharmacology (including Materia Medica), Applied 
Anatomy, Surgery, Medicine, Pathological Chemistry. 

At the end of the fifth session: — 

Surgery, Medicine, Therapeutics, Obstetrics, Gynaecology, Patho- 
logy, Pediatrics, Applied Anatomy, Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat, Juris- 
prudence, Preventive Medicine, Psychopathology. 

At the end of the sixth session: — 

Surgery, Medicine, Gynaecology, Obstetrics, Serology and Pathology, 
Preventive Medicine, Psychiatry, Applied Anatomy, Eye, Ear, Nose 
and Throat, Pediatrics. 


Equivalent Examinations 


The following courses and examinations in Arts will be accepted in 
Medicine: — 


Arts 

1. Courses and examinations in 
Biology 1 and 2. 

2. Courses and examinations in 
General Chemistry and Qualitat- 
ive Analysis. 

3. Course and examination in 
Organic Chemistry. 

4. Course and examination in 
Physics 1 in Arts or Science. 

5. Course and examination in 
Physics 2. 


Medicine 

1. Course and examination in 
first year General Biology. 

2. Course and examination in 
first year Chemistry. 

3. Course and examination in 
second year Chemistry. 

4. Course and examination in 
first year Physics. 

5. Attendance on Lectures until 
Christmas, in second year Physics. 


The courses in Chemistry and Physics must be taken in the Univer- 
sity; the classes will not be allowed to holders of certificates of Honour 
Matriculation. 


—36— 


FEES 
First Year 


Sessional fee (including Registration, Tuition, Examinations, 

Library, Laboratory fees, and Degree fee) $ 175.00 

Student interests (including Health Insurance, Athletics, Alma 
Mater Society, “Queen’s Journal”, Aesculapian Society, and 
Union) 23.00 


Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Years 

Sessional fee (including Registration, Tuition, Examinations, 

Library, Laboratory fees. Degree fee and Student interests 220.00 


Sessional Laboratory deposit (each year) 10.00 

Additional fee in each year for Non-British subjects 50.00 

Special Fees, payable when incurred: 

Late Registration 3.00 

Supplemental Fee (in one or more subjects) 10.00 

Degree of Doctor of Science , 50.00 

Diploma of Public Health 20.00 

Extra Fee for Degree in Absentia 10.00 

Pro tanto fee 10.00 


All Fees and deposits are payable to the Treasurer of the Univer- 
sity. 

Fees may be paid in two equal instalments, in which case an ad- 
ditional $5.00 will be added to the first instalment. This first instal- 
ment and the laboratory deposit must be paid at the time of registration, 
and the balance paid on or before January 4th, 1936. No student will 
be admitted to classes until the above conditions have been complied 
with, nor will he be permitted to continue the work of the second term 
until the fees have been paid in full. 


BOARD AND ROOM 

During the session 1934-1935 students have paid from $5.00 to $6.00 
a week for board, and $2.50 to $3.00 for room, so that satisfactory board 
and lodging may be obtained at from $7.50 to $9.00 per week. Lists of 
boarding and lodging houses may be obtained from the Secretary of the 
Faculty. 


—37- 


MICROSCOPES 

Every student entering the Faculty of Medicine will be required 
to have at the commencement of his studies, a first-class microscope of 
approved design. Such an instrument is an essential part of the 
equipment of a practitioner in medicine. 

The Faculty of Medicine have made arrangements whereby such in- 
struments can be purchased at a low price, either for cash at cost or 
by three equal annual payments which include carrying charges. In 
the latter case the microscope is retained by the University during 
vacations until payment is completed. 

Further information regarding the microscopes and methods of 
payment may be obtained from the Secretary of the Faculty of Medi- 
cine. 


PHYSICAL WELFARE OF STUDENTS 

The sessional fee includes a contribution towards a health insurance 
fund which the University will use to provide medical care for those 
who are ill. 

Each first year student is given a physical examination by the Uni- 
versity physician, and corrective exercises in the Gymnasium are pre- 
scribed when they are needed. 

All students admitted must produce evidence of successful vaccina- 
tion. 

Gymnasium work for two hours each week is required of all first 
year students except those excused by the Medical Adviser. Voluntary 
classes are offered other students, and arrangements can readily be 
made for daily exercise in the building. The gymnasium, built during 
the summer of 1930, is a modern stone building 60 x 105 feet and is 
equipped with lockers, shower-baths, a swimming pool, running track, 
and all apparatus for physical training. 

Athletics 

As a member of the Canadian Intercollegiate Amateur Athletic As- 
sociation, Queen’s gives every opportunity for students to compete in 
intercollegiate athletics on some of the many teams representing the 
University, while the student who is not a good enough athlete to find a 
place on a University team has the chance to play in inter-year and 
inter-faculty games. 


—38— 


Each student pays an Athletic Fee of $5.00, which is collected with 
the sessional fee and paid to the Athletic Board of Control, by whom 
all athletic activities, the rink, the playing fields and the gymnasium are 
controlled. 

During the summer of 1921, through the generosity of Dr. James 
Richardson, of Winnipeg, a graduate in Arts and now Chancellor 
of the University, the George Richardson Memorial Stadium was 
built on the Union Street Campus. The grand stand and bleachers 
accommodate about 6,000 spectators, and the playing field is unexcelled 
by any in Canada. 

The Jock Harty Arena, built in 1921, was destroyed by fire in the 
spring of 1924. It was rebuilt on the same site during the summer. 
The new arena is equipped with an artificial ice plant. 


STUDENT ADVISERS 

In order to assist students in the selection of optional courses (in 
the case of freshmen) and in general methods of study and in the 
solution of personal and class problems, a student adviser has been 
appointed for each of the first two years. 

Adviser for the first year, 1934-35, Professor J. K. Robertson. 

Adviser for the second year, 1934-35, Dr. G. Spencer Melvin. 


THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY 

Queen's was the first University in Canada to introduce Student 
Government. All students are members of the Alma Mater Society, the 
chief instrument of Student Government, and are expected to share in 
its duties and responsibilities. 


THE AESCULAPIAN SOCIETY 


All students registered in the Faculty of Medicine are members of 
the Aesculapian Society, and amenable to its rules and regulations. 


Honorary President 

President 

Vice-President .... 

Secretary 

Assistant Secretary 
Treasurer . 


Office Bearers 

Dr. W. T. Connell 

J. B. McCarthy, '35 

W. C. McIntosh, '36 

J. V. Nelles, '35 

J. A. MacDonald, '38 

G. C. Caughey, '37 


—39— 


THE CANADIAN OFFICERS’ TRAINING CORPS 

The Queen’s University Contingent of the C.O.T.C. formed at the out- 
break of the Great War under Lt.-Col. A. B. Cunningham, was organized 
as a unit of the Militia in February, 1915. Re-organized after the War 
by Col. A. Macphail, C.M.G., D.S.O., it is now commanded by Lt.-Col. 
D. M. Jemmett, D.C.M., and consists of three companies: “A” Coy. 
(Arts), “B” Coy. (Medicine), and “C” Coy. (Science). 

The training, after recruit year, prepares for examination for “A” 
and “B” Certificates in Infantry and Medical Services, qualifying, the 
first for the rank of Lieutenant, the second for that of Captain. Com- 
missions in the Permanent Force are offered from time to time to 
qualified members of the C.O.T.C. Students who enrol in their first 
year, complete the year’s training and are returned as efficient, are ex- 
cused from Physical Training. No student may try for “A” Medical 
Certificate until his fourth year in Medicine. 


HIGHER DEGREES 


DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF SCIENCE (D.Sc.) 

The degree of D.Sc. is granted under the following conditions: 

(1) A period of two years must elapse between graduation as M.D. 
and the completion of the course. 

(2) Original and independent research in some subject of import- 
ance to medical science must be undertaken. 

(3) The candidate must submit a thesis embodying the results of 
his research. The literary as well as the scientific quality of the thesis 
is to be taken into account in judging the candidate’s fitness to proceed 
to the examination. 

(4) The candidate must apply in writing to the Secretary at least 
two years before he proposes to present himself for final examination, 
and must submit the subject of his research for approval. 

(5) The examinations upon subjects cognate to that of the thesis 
will be assigned by the Faculty and include a reading knowledge of 
scientific French or German. 


DIPLOMA OF PUBLIC HEALTH (D.P.H.) 

A. For candidates who have taken the B.Sc., M.D. course. 

Such candidates will be entitled to enter for examination for this 
Diploma on presenting certificates of having taken: 

(1) Three months in attendance and clinical instruction in a Hos- 
pital for infectious diseases. 

(2) Three months in a Bacteriological Laboratory, devoted to bac- 
teriological aspects of Public Health. 

(3) One week in practical testing of milk and milk products for 
chemical constitution and common adulterations. 

(4) Six months with a recognized Medical Officer of Health in the 
practical study of Sanitation. 


— 40 — 


—41— 


B. For candidates proceeding to take this Diploma after gradual 
tion as M.D. 

Such candidates will be entitled to enter for examination for this 
Diploma on presenting certificates of having taken: 

(1) Three months’ course in Sanitary Physics (principles of statics, 
pneumatics, hydraulics, light, photometry, heat, thermometry, hygro- 
metry) . 

(2) Three months’ course in Sanitary Chemistry, especially de- 
voted to quantitative and qualitative analysis of air, water, and common 
foodstuffs; this course must include one week’s work in practical test- 
ing of milk and milk products for adulteration or sophistication. 

(3) Three months’ course in a Bacteriological Laboratory devoted 
to bacteriological aspects of Public Health work, such as examination 
of sputum, blood, swabs, water and milk, and the detection of common 
animal parasites. 

(4) Three months’ course in advanced Hygiene, covering especially 
a discussion of sewage and garbage disposal, water supplies, disinfec- 
tion, transmissible diseases, vital statistics and sanitary legislation. 

(5) Three months’ course in Sanitary Engineering, including water 
services, sewerage systems, sewage and garbage disposal. 

(6) Three months’ attendance and clinical instruction in a Hospital 
for Infectious Diseases. 

(7) Six months with a recognized Medical Officer of Health in the 
study of practical sanitation. 


SCHOLARSHIPS AND HONOURS 


The following scholarships and honours are awarded to students in 
the Faculty of Medicine. The scholarships, except those awarded in the 
final year, are tenable only by students in residence in the session fol- 
lowing the award. 

The Robert Bruce Scholarship 

The Robert Bruce Scholarship of about $90 awarded at the end of 
the first year to the student of Scottish extraction making the highest 
number of marks in the examinations of that year. One-third of the 
value of the Scholarship will be paid to the winner in each of the second, 
third, and fourth years of his course, provided he is in attendance in 
the Faculty in which the award was made. 

This Scholarship has been established under provisions in the will 
of the late Robert Bruce of Quebec, and similar scholarships are awarded 
in the Faculties of Arts and Science. 

Khaki University and Y.M.C.A. Memorial Fund 

This fund is part of a sum, left from the Khaki University after 
the War, which was divided among the Canadian Universities. 

The interest, amounting to $240, will be used to award one or more 
scholarships open to undergraduate students in any Faculty. In award- 
ing these scholarships the need as well as the standing of applicants 
will be considered and preference will be given to sons or daughters of 
soldiers of the Great War. Applications will be received by the Regis- 
trar up to April 1st. 

The Reuben Wells Leonard Fellowships and Scholarships 

Under the will of the late Reuben Wells Leonard provision was 
made for the following Fellowships and Scholarships: 

The Reuben Wells Leonard Fellowships 

Four Fellowships of the value of $500 will be awarded to graduates 
of the University “who are willing and qualified to undertake inde- 
pendent research work in the interests of higher culture”. These Fel- 
lowships are tenable only by students in attendance at Queen’s. 

Application must be made to the Registrar not later than April 1st. 


— 42 — 


■43— 


The Reuben Wells Leonard Undergraduate Scholarships 

Two Scholarships of the value of $150 each and one of the value 
of $200. One of these Scholarships is awarded in each Faculty to the 
student standing highest at the end of his penultimate year. The 
student must be in residence in his final year. 

Faculty Scholarship 

A Faculty Scholarship of $40 awarded to the student making the 
highest number of marks on the examinations, of the second year. 

The N. F. Dupuis Scholarship 

The N. F. Dupuis Scholarship of $50 awarded to the student making 
the highest number of marks in the examinations in Chemistry of the 
third year. This Scholarship was founded by the graduates as a mark 
of their appreciation of the long and effective services of the late Dr. 
N. F. Dupuis, Professor of Mathematics. 

The Dean Fowler Scholarship 

The Dean Fowler Scholarship of $40 awarded to the student making 
the highest number of marks in the examinations of the fourth year. 

Sylvanus Joy Scholarship 

A Scholarship of $40 awarded for proficiency in Materia Medica. 

The D. T. Smith Prize in Pharmacology 

A prize, value $20, awarded to the student in the fourth year 
making the highest number of marks in Pharmacology. 

The David Edward Mundell Prize 

The David Edward Mundell Prize of $40, awarded to the student 
making the highest aggregate marks in the Surgical Applied Anatomy 
final examination of the fifth and sixth years. 

Faculty Scholarship 

A Faculty Scholarship of $40 awarded to the student making the 
highest number of marks in the examinations of the fifth year. 

Sir John C. Schultz Memorial Scholarship 

Value $80. Founded by his widow in memory of the late Sir John 
C. Schultz, K.C.M.G., M.D., LL.D., F.R.S., a leader of the loyal settlers 
against Riel in the Rebellion of 1869-70, and later a Lieutenant Gover- 
nor of Manitoba The Scholarship is based on the combined results of 
the sessional examinations of the fourth and fifth years, and is awarded 


—44— 


when the student is in actual attendance in his final year. It is open 
only to male students of British descent, and the holder must be of good 
Christian character, a total abstainer, and of satisfactory scholastic 
attainments. Preference will be given to non-smokers and to students 
who are planning to become medical missionaries. 

Ontario Medical Association Prize in Preventive Medicine 

An annual prize oif twenty-five dollars has been instituted in the 
class of Preventive Medicine by the Ontario Medical Association. The 
first award of the prize was made at the close of session 1931-32 to the 
student who gained the highest marks in the class examinations. 

Professor’s Prize in Surgery 

A prize awarded to the student in the final year making the highest 
standing in Surgical Subjects. 

Professor’s Prize in Medicine 

A prize awarded to the student in the final year making the highest 
standing in Medical Subjects. 

Professor’s Prize for Pathological Cases 

A prize awarded to the student who makes the highest marks on 
the series of pathological cases sent in. 

Professor’s Prize in Preventive Medicine 

A prize awarded to the student who is proxime accessit in the class, 

University Medals 

A University Medal awarded to the student making the highest 
number of marks in the examinations of the sixth year in Clinical 
Medicine, Pathology, Preventive Medicine, Psychiatry, and Jurispru- 
dence. 

A University Medal awarded to the student making the highest 
number of marks in the examinations of the sixth year in Clinical 
Surgery, Obstetrics, Gynaecology, Applied Anatomy, and Eye, Ear, Nose 
and Throat. 

The following awards are not endowed and are made only if the 
money is available: — 

The New York Alumni Association Prize 

The New York Alumni Association Prize of $50 awarded to the 
student making the highest number of marks in the courses in Em- 
bryology and Histology of the second year. 


—45— 


The Boak Prize 

The Boak Prize in Anatomy, value $25, donated by Dr. Eric 
W. Boak, of Victoria, B.C., awarded to the student making the highest 
number of marks in the written and oral examinations in Anatomy of 
the third year. 

Canadian National Committee for Mental Hygiene Scholarship 

Canadian National Committee for Mental Hygiene Scholarship of 
$50, awarded to the student making the highest number of marks in 
Psychiatry. 

Scholarship in Psychiatry 

A Scholarship of $25 presented by Dr. B. T. McGhie, Deputy 
Minister of Hospitals, to be awarded to the student making the highest 
marks in the examination in Psycho-pathology in the fifth year. 

The James Prize 

A Prize of $20 in gold given by Dr. James of Mattawa for the best 
examination in final year Medicine and Clinical Medicine. 

Hospital Appointments 

Four Interneships at the Kingston General Hospital of twelve 
months each are awarded to students of the graduating class. These 
appointments must be approved by the Board of Governors of the 
Kingston General Hospital. Application for these appointments must be 
made to the Secretary of the Faculty not later than December 15th in 
each year. 

Two Clinical Assistantships are available on the staff of the On- 
tario Hospital for the Insane during the summer. Applications must 
be made to the Superintendent, by whom the appointments are deter- 
mined. Emphasis is laid on the special qualifications necessary for such 
work. 


Richardson Fellow in Pathology — General Hospital 

On the foundation of this Fellowship in 1927, Mrs. A. F. Richardson 
undertook to maintain the annual salary of a clinical Pathologist to 
the Hospital for a period of five years. Mrs. Richardson d'ed in 1931, 
but has made provision for the maintenance of the Fellowship. Appoint- 
ment is open to graduates, preference being given to those who have 
previously served as Internes or taken special training in Pathology. 


*-46— 


Salary, $50 per month, with rooms and board in Hospital. Ap- 
pointments may be held for one or more years at the discretion of the 
Committee. The appointee will have the status of a senior interne in 
Hospital, and outlining of duties will be under control of a Committee 
consisting of the Professors of Medicine, Surgery and Pathology. 

Exhibition of 1851 — Science Research Scholarship 

This scholarship of the annual value of £250 stg., is awarded by 
Her Majesty’s Commissioners for the Exhibition of 1851 to students 
who have given evidence of capacity for original research, and are 
under 26 years of age. A given number of scholarships are awarded 
annually to students in Canada, recommended by the universities ap- 
proved by the Commissioners. 

The nominee must be a British subject, must have been a bona fide 
student of science for three years, must have been a student of the Uni- 
versity for a full year immediately before his nomination, must be a 
student of the University at the time of his nomination, and must 
pledge himself not to hold any position of emolument whilst holding 
the scholarship without special permission from the Commissioners. 
He is recommended to the Commissioners by the Senate of the Univer- 
sity. The scholarship will be tenable ordinarily for two years, and in 
cases of exceptional merit, for three years. The scholar will in the 
absence of special circumstances be required to proceed to a country 
other than that in which he received his scientific training and there 
pursue some investigation likely to promote technical industries or 
scientific culture. The particular investigation the student proposes to 
pursue must be stated before a scholarship can be awarded. 

The George Christian Hoffman Fellowships 

The Alpha Fellowship for Pathological Research of $800 and the 
Beta Fellowship for extended studies in Surgery of $600’ awarded to 
recent graduates nominated by the Faculty and approved by the Senate 
of the University. The awards will be determined by the undergradu- 
ate record of the candidates and upon evidence of capacity for original 
research. Applications for these Fellowships should be made to the 
Secretary of the Faculty not later than the first of March in each year. 

The holders of the Fellowships shall proceed to some Institution or 
University in Europe or the United States of America, approved by the 
Senate of the University, where post-graduate study and research may 
most advantageously be pursued. The Fellowships may be tenable for 
a second or even a third year, upon the recommendation of the Faculty. 


— 47 — 


The George Christian Hoffman Fellowships have been awarded as 
follows : 

In Pathology: — 1919, Clifford D. Gallagher, M.B. (1916), M.D., 
C.M. (1921). 

1921, Theo. J. Curphey, M.D., C.M. (1921). 

1923, Wm. Susman, B.A., M.D., C.M. (1923). 

1926, P. Thomas Mcllroy, M.B. (1916), M.D., C.M. 

(1921). 

1927, John H. Orr, M.D., C.M. (1923). 

1928, G. Harold Ettinger, B.A., M.D., C.M. (1920) 

1929, J. A. Hannah, B.A., M.D., C.M. (1928). 

1930, John Mann, M.D., C.M. (1927). 

1931, W. Ford Connell, M.D., C.M. (1929). 

1932, John T. Tweddell, M.D., C.M .(1931). 

1933, Eldon M. Boyd, M.A., M.D., C.M. (1932). 

1934, Kenneth A. Roberts, M.D., C.M. (1932). 

In Surgery: — 1921, Lyon H. Appleby, M.D., C.M. (1919). 

1922, Calvert M. Carruthers, M.D., C.M. (1921) 

1923, C. Merlin Eynon, M.D., C.M. (1922). 

1924, Arnold R. Richards, M.D., C.M. (1923). 

1925, N. Roy Houston, M.D., C.M. (1922). 

1926, Stuart W. Houston, M.D., C.M. (1924). 

1927, John L. McKelvey, B.A., M.D., C.M. (1926). 

1928, Nathan E. Berry, M.D., C.M. (1926). 

1929, Nathan E. Berry, M.D., C.M. (1926). 

1930, Geo. C. Ferguson, B.A., M.D., C.M. (1928). 

1931, Joseph A. Kearns, M.D., C.M. (1930). 

1932, Eldon M. Boyd, M.A., M.D., C.M. (1932). 

1933, Lawrence R. LeFave, M.D., C.M. (1932). 

1934, Ronald C. Burr, M.D., C.M. (1932). 

William Spankie Memorial Medical Research Endowment Fund 

The late Dr. William Spankie provided in his Will for a fund 
‘‘to promote Medical Research at Queen’s University under rules and 
regulations to be determined by the Board of Trustees and approved 
by the Executors and Trustees of the Estate.” 

The present income is $400 a year. 

The research must be carried on at Queen’s University or in one 
of the City Hospitals associated with it. 

Reports upon research problems assisted by the fund must be sub- 
mitted to the Committee of Administration. 

All applications for grants should be addressed to the Principal. 


—48— 


STUDENT EXCHANGES 

It is probable that from time to time student exchanges will be 
arranged with French and German universities. The scholarship will 
cover tuition, board and lodging. Applications will be received by the 
Registrar each year up to March 1st from final year and graduate 
students. 


REQUIREMENTS FOR LICENSE 


Kingston is a centre for the Examinations of the Medical Council of 
Canada, and also for those of the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
of Ontario. Graduates who propose to take the examinations of these 
licensing bodies, are able to do so immediately after the examinations 
of the University. The written examinations are held in one of the 
University buildings, and the clinical examinations in the General Hos- 
pital. 

Dominion of Canada 

A University Degree does not give the right to practise the pro- 
fession of Medicine. It is also necessary to conform with the laws per- 
taining to the practice of Medicine in the province, state or country in 
which it is proposed to begin practice. The Medical Council of Canada 
issues a diploma which is accepted for registration in any province of 
the Dominion. 

In order to qualify for the examinations of the Canada Medical 
Council, the candidate must hold the license of a Provincial Board, or 
present a certificate from the Registrar of a Provincial Medical Council 
that he holds a medical degree from an approved Medical College. Stu- 
dents are advised to secure this qualification in preference to one from 
any provincial council. The announcement of the Medical Council of 
Canada may be obtained from Dr. J. Fenton Argue, Registrar, 180 
Metcalfe Street, Ottawa. 

Each province in Canada has a special standard of medical educa- 
tion and special requirements for license. Detailed information as to 
qualifications for the practice of Medicine in the various provinces may 
be obtained from the Provincial Registrars, as follows: 

Alberta: Dr. G. R. Johnston, 224 Seventh Avenue West, Calgary. 

British Columbia: Dr. A. J. MacLachlan, 203 Medical Dental 
Building, Vancouver (Acting Registrar). 

Manitoba: Dr. W. G. Campbell, 605 Medical Arts Building, Win- 
nipeg. 

New Brunsiuick: Dr. S. H. MacDonald, 56 Coburg St., Saint John, 

N.B. 

Nova Scotia: Dr. H. L. Scammell, Provincial Medical Board of 
Nova Scotia, Halifax. 

Ontario: Dr. H. Wilberforce Aikins, 566 University Ave., Toronto. 


— 49 — 


Prince Edward Island'. Dr. H. D. Johnson, 275 Richmond St., Char- 
lottetown. 

Saskatchewan: Dr. A. M. Young, Saskatoon. 

Quebec: Dr. J. E. Laberge, Le College des Medecins et Chirurgiens 
de la Province de Quebec, Montreal. 

Great Britain and Ireland 

The General Council of Medical Education and Registration has 
general supervision over the various licensing and examining Boards 
and keeps the Medical Register. The main licensing and examining 
bodies recognized in Great Britain apart from the universities are as 
follows : 

In England: — The Conjoint Board of the Royal College of Surgeons 
of England and Royal College of Physicians of London, and the Society 
of Apothecaries, London. Information can be obtained from the Secre- 
tary of the English Conjoint Board, 8-11, Queen Square, Bloomsbury, 
London, W.C. 1, and the clerk of the Society of Apothecaries, Water 
Lane, Blackfriars, E.C. 4. 

In Ireland: — The Conjoint Board of the Royal Colleges of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons of Ireland, and the Apothecaries’ Hall of Ireland. 
Information can be obtained from the Secretary of the Irish Conjoint 
Board, Royal College of Surgeons, Dublin, and the Registrar, Apothe- 
caries’ Hall of Ireland, 93, Merrion Square, Dublin. 

In Scotland — The Conjoint Board of the Royal Colleges of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons of Edinburgh and the Royal Faculty of Physicians 
and Surgeons of Glasgow. Information can be obtained from the Sec- 
retary of the Scottish Conjoint Board, 49, Lauriston Place, Edinburgh. 

Certificates of Queen’s University Medical Faculty are accepted by 
these Boards for admission to their examinations, so that those possess- 
ing the degree of M.D. from Queen’s University are entitled to all the 
privileges in Great Britain that are accorded to students and graduates 
of other Colonial Colleges and Universities. 

United States 

The Journal of the American Medical Association publishes an Ab- 
stract of the Laws regulating the Practice of Medicine in the various 
States and Territories of the United States. The price of the pamphlet 
is 50c., and it may be obtained by addressing the American Medical As- 
sociation, 535 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 

The Medical School is listed as Class A by the Council on Medical 
Education and Hospitals of the American Medical Association. 


COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


ANATOMY 

A 

Descriptive and Practical Anatomy 
Professor — D. C. Matheson, M.B. 

Assistant Professor — C. R. Salsbury, M.D., C.M. 
Demonstrator — Stuart W. Houston, M.D., C.M., F.R.C.S. 
(Edin.), F.R.C.S.(C.) 

Demonstrator — Arthur E. Harbeson, M.D., C.M. 

Second Year 

(а) The study of the bones and the dissection of the upper extrem- 

ity. 

(б) The bones of the trunk and dissection of the thorax. 

(c) The bones of the head and dissection of the head and neck. 

(d) Class review and demonstration on the parts dissected, con- 

ducted twice weekly, or more frequently when it seems neces- 
sary. 

(e) In addition to the above, an elementary course of lectures on 

the Systematic Anatomy of the body as a whole. 

Third Year 

{a) The study of the bones and the dissection of the lower extrem- 
ity. 

(&) The dissection of the abdomen and pelvis. 

(c) The dissection of the brain. 

(d) Class review and demonstration on the parts dissected, con- 

ducted twice weekly, or as often as necessary. 

(e) A review of the work of the second year. 

Students must dissect the whole of the human body, during the 
course. Preliminary and final oral examinations are required from 
each student, on each part dissected. Besides these, mid-seasonal writ- 
ten examinations are held in December, and final written examinations 
at the close of the spring term. Students must complete the dissection 
and take all oral examinations before being allowed to proceed with the 
final written examinations. 


— 51 — 


—52 


Bones of the head, trunk and upper extremity are loaned to second 
year students and bones of the lower extremity to third year students. 

Arrangements may be made by graduates and others for the use 
of the dissecting room and for material for special study. Encourage- 
ment is given to students of the 4th, 5th and 6th years who wish to do 
review work in the dissecting room. 

Text-Books and Books of Reference 

Gray, Cunningham, Morris, Piersol, Buchanan. Cunningham: Man- 
ual of Practical Anatomy. Walmsley: Practical Anatomy. Practical 
Anatomy hy Six Teachers, edited by Stibbe. Jamieson: Companion to 
Anatomy. Wolff: A Shorter Anatomy. Kellogg: The Anatomy of 
Surgical Approaches. Frazer: The Anatomy of the Human Skeleton. 
SobottarMcMurrich : Atlas of Human Anatmny. Spaltehqjlz: Hand 
Atlas of Human Anatomy. Toldt: An Atlas of Human Anatomy. 
Jamieson: Illustrations of Regional Anatomy. Eycleshymer and Schoe- 
maker: A Cross-section Anatomy. Kuntz: Neuro-anatomy. Herrick: 
Neurology. Ranson: Anatomy of the Nervous System. Kuntz: Auto- 
nomic Nervous System. Looney: Anatomy of the Brain and Spinal 
Cord. Rasmussen: The Principal Nervous Pathways. Globus: Neuro- 
anatomy. Arey: Developmental Anatomy. Bailey and Miller: Text- 
book of Embryology. Simkins: Text-book of Human Embryology. 
Frazer: Manual of Embryology. Keith: Human Embryology and Morph- 
ology. Maximow: Text-book of Histology. 

B 

' Medical and Surgical Anatomy 

Professor - - - L. J. Austin, M.Ch., F.R.C.S.Eng., 

F.R.C.S.(C.) 

Associate Professor — J. F. Sparks, B.A., M.D., C.M., 

F.R.C.S.(C.) 

Assistant Professor — S. J. Keyes, M.D., C.M., F.R.C.S.(C.) 

Assistant Professor — S. W. Houston, M.D., C.M., F.R.C.S. 

(Edin.), F.R.C.S. (C.) 

The students are taught to make practical use of the facts of ana- 
tomy, and the application of these to medical and surgical practice is 
shown. Attention is directed to the manner in which the anatomy 
affects the course and progress of disease, and to the alteration in the 
anatomical relations in disease. Special attention is given to displace- 
ments in fractures and dislocations, topographical anatomy, and liga- 
ture of arteries. 

Approved Text-Books 

Davis, Treves and Keith, Beesly and Johnson, Campbell. Rawling: 
Landmarks and Surface Markings. C. Latimer Callander: Surgical 
Anatomy. 


—53— 


BACTERIOLOGY 

Professor — Guilford B. Reed, M.A., B.Sc., Ph.D., F.R.S.C. 

Assistant Professor — John H. Orr, M.D., C.M., F.R.C.P.(C.) 

Lecturer — J. E. Josephson, M.D., C.M. 

Third Year 

1. General and Pathogenic Bacteriology. This course covers the 
general principles of bacteriology. The lectures deal with the structure 
and physiology of bacteria, the theories of infection and immunity 
and a systematic study of the pathogenic bacteria. Laboratory practice 
includes the preparation of culture media and the biochemical, cultural 
and microscopic study of bacteria. The principal pathogenic bacteria 
are isolated from hospital material. 

Included in the above is a systematic examination of the principles 
of infection and immunity, the production of immune bodies and im- 
mune reactions. This will be supplemented by a detailed bacteriological 
study of selected cases, laboratory work, prescribed reading and reports. 

2. Parasitology. A laboratory study of the principal lower animal 
parasites. 

Text-books: — 

Zinsser and Bayne-Jones: Text-Book of Bacteriology. 

Topley and Wilson: Principles of Bacteriology. 

Chandler: Animal Parasites of Man. 

Sixth Year 

A series of lectures will be given in the sixth year stressing the 
clinical application of the principles of infection and immunity dealt 
with in the third year. The various infectious processes will be dis- 
cussed from the point of view of aetiology, mode of entrance and action 
in the body of the causal organism. Methods of laboratory diagnosis 
and specific treatment will be stressed. 

Elective Courses 

1. Immunology and Physiology of the Bacteria. Lectures, reading 
and laboratory practice. 

2. Research. Properly qualified students who wish to make a 
special study of Bacteriology are admitted to the laboratory to under- 
take special problems. This work may be carried out during the ses- 
sion or in the summer, or both. 


—54— 


BIOLOGY 

Lecturer — G. Krotkov, M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistants — K. S. Brunton 

A. B. Smith 

First Year 

1. General Biology. — A course of three lectures and six hours of 
laboratory work per week throughout the session — botany in the first 
term and zoology in the second. 

A general survey of the plant and animal kingdoms with laboratory 
work on representatives of the main groups; special attention being 
given to higher plants and mammals; identification of poisonous and 
medicinal plants and of the commoner animals of Canada; principles 
of physiology; evolution, genetics and eugenics. 

Text-books: Holman and Robbins, Textbook of General Botany (John 
Wiley and Sons). Woodruff, Foundations of Biology (MacrniWan, fourth 
edition) . 

CHEMISTRY 

Associate Professor of Biochemistry — J. F. Logan, M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of General Chemistry — 

R. L. Dorrance, M.A. 

Assistant in Organic Chemistry — E. H. Charlesworth, D.Phil. 

All lecture and laboratory classes in Chemistry are conducted in 
Gordon Hall. 

Examinations are held at intervals during the session and the stand- 
ing of the student is determined by the results of these examinations 
and by the character of his laboratory work, as well as by the grade 
obtained at the annual examination. 

No student is admitted to the annual examination who has failed 
to attain a certain standard in the laboratory exercises. 

A laboratory deposit of $10 for each course is required to cover 
breakage of apparatus and damage to laboratory property and must be 
paid to the Treasurer of the University before a locker will be assigned. 

First Year 

1. General Chemistry and Analysis. 

{a) A course of three lectures per week on the fundamental laws 
and theories of these two subjects. This course includes a description 
of the common elements and compounds and a discussion of elementary 
qualitative analysis. The lectures are illustrated by demonstrations 
and laboratory exercises. 


—55— 


(6) A course of six hours per week of laboratory exercises in 
General Chemistry and Analysis. These exercises aim to train the 
student in laboratory technique, in learning the properties of the ele- 
ments and their common compounds, and in the detection of the positive 
and negative radicals of all the common salts. Volumetric analysis is 
also included in the course. 

Text-books: — Kendall, Smithes College Chemistry. Belcher and Col- 
bert: Experiments and Problems for College Chemistry. Belcher and 
Colbert: Identification and Properties of the Common Metals and Non- 
metals. 

Collegiate chemistry with laboratory exercises should precede this 
course. Collegiate chemistry A 1 (Arts Calendar) will not be accepted as 
equivalent to the first year medical' chemistry unless offered in con- 
junction with the course in qualitative analysis, A 2. 

Second Year 

2. Organic Chemistry. 

Three hours lectures, and one laboratory period of three hours per 
week are given until the student is well grounded in the fundamentals 
of Organic Chemistry, essential to the proper understanding of Bio- 
chemistry and its related sciences. Both aliphatic and aromatic com- 
pounds are prepared, and their properties and rea,ctions discussed. 
Throughout the course emphasis is placed upon structural relationships 
of all compounds. In the latter part of the year the time is devoted 
to a detailed study of the carbohydrates, fats and proteins, as an in- 
troduction to the major course in Physiological Chemistry of the fol- 
lowing year. 

Text-books: — Lowy and Harrow: Introduction to Organic Chemis- 
try. Fisher: Laboratory Manual of Organic Chemistry; or, Lowy and 
Baldwin: A Laboratory Manual of Organic Chemistry. 

Third Year 

3. Physiological Chemistry. 

Two hours lectures, and three hours laboratory, per week, are 
given throughout the year. This course follows naturally after the 
completion of the Organic Chemistry of the second year, in which the 
carbohydrates, fats, and proteins are taken up in detail. Physiological 
Chemistry includes a fairly comprehensive study of the chemical pro- 
cesses involved in respiration, secretion, digestion, absorption, meta- 
bolism and excretion, and the chemistry of the tissues. The composi- 
tion of foods and the elements of the science of nutrition are also 
discussed. 


56— 


Text-books: — 

Bodansky: Introduction to Physiological Chemistry. 

Hawk and Bergeim: Practical Physiological Chemistry. 

Books of Reference 

Mathews: Physiological Chemistry. Macleod: Physiology and Bio- 
chemistry in Modern Medicine. Cole: Practical Physiological Chemis- 
try. Cameron: Text Book of Biochemistry. Lusk: The Science of 
Nutrition. Sherman: The Chemistry of Food and Nutrition. Sherman 
and Smith: The Vitamines. Monographs on Biochemistry. 

Fourth Year 

4. Pathological Chemistry. 

A course of one lecture a week on the chemistry of pathological 
processes. 

Reference books: — Wells: Chemical Pathology. Beaumont and 
Dodds: Recent Advances in Medicine. Campbell and MacLeod: Insulin 
and Diabetes. MacLean: Modern Methods in the Diagnosis and Treat- 
ment of Renal Disease. Rehfus: Diseases of the Stomach MacLean: 
Modern Views on Digestion and Gastric Disease. Stewart and Dunlop: 
Clinical Chemistry in Practical Medicine. Joslin: The Treatment of 
Diabetes Mellitus. 

ENGLISH 

The Department of English provides a course (English M) which 
must be taken by all first year Medical students. A list of the required 
readings will be furnished at the beginning of the Session. 

Prescribed texts: — 

Foerster and Steadman, Writing and Thinking .(Boston: Houghton 
Mifflin Company) . 

R. M. Gay (Ed.), The College Book of Prose. (Boston: Houghton 
Mifflin Company). 

The Concise Oxford Dictionary. (Toronto: Oxford University Press). 

EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

F. A. Cays, M.D., C.M., F.R.C.S. (C.) — 

Professor {Division of Oto-laryngology) . 
C. E. O’Connor, M.D., C.M . — Associate Professor (at Hotel Dieu). 

H. C. Connell, B.A., M.D., C.M. — 

Assistant Professor {Division of Oto-laryngology) . 
H. P. Folger, B.A., M.D., C.M. — 

Assistant Professor {Division of Ophthalmology) . 
F. X. O’Connor, M.D., C.M . — Clinical Assistant. 


— 57 — 


The course of instruction is carried on in the Kingston General 
Hospital. There is both an In-door and Out-door service. A large Clinic 
room, in which there are three cubicles, is used for clinics and for teach- 
ing the examination of patients. 

This course is carried on during both fifth and sixth years. 

Clinics for the final year students are given one day a week at the 
Hotel Dieu Hospital. 

Most of the work is clinical and in addition to this, a series of lec- 
tures is delivered upon the various diseases of the Eye, Ear, Nose and 
Throat. 

Text-books: — May, Parsons, Swanzy, Gleeson, Logan Turner. 

Reference Books: — Fuchs, Ball, de Schweinitz, St. Clair Thomson, 
Phillips, Skillern. 


GYNAECOLOGY 

Professor — G. W. Mylks, M.D., F.R.C.S.(C). 

Assistant Professor — Presley A. McLeod, B.A., M.D., C.M. 

Fifth Year 

The course includes methods of pelvic examination, the disorders of 
menstruation, diseases of the female generative organs, injuries to the 
pelvic floor, urinary bladder and rectum, malformations and displace- 
ments of the uterus, extra-uterine pregnancy and benign and malignant 
growths affecting the female genitalia. 

At the Hospital, demonstrations are given in operative technique, 
post-operative treatment and instruments used in gynaecologic cases, 
also in the application of pessaries and such local treatments as douches, 
tamponade, etc. The various pelvic and vaginal operations are per- 
formed before sections of the class. 

Sixth Year 

The work of the sixth year is taken up in the hospitals and is 
largely clinical and operative, including special methods of examination 
such as sterility tests, etc. Special attention is given to the pathology 
of pelvic growths. 

Books of Reference 

Eden and Lockyer, James Young, Herman, Eden, Anspach, Diseases 
of Women by Ten Teachers, Graves, Crossen, Kelly, Barbour and 
Watson. Bourne: Synopsis Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 


— 58 — 


HISTORY OF MEDICINE 

Professor — Thomas Gibson, M.A, M.B,, C.M., Edin., F.R.C.P.(C.). 

Sixth Year 

This course consists of a weekly series of informal talks illustrative 
of the great episodes in the History of Medicine. Interest naturally 
centres around the lives of the great path finders, and the fresh truths 
they gave the world. 

As far as possible these are exemplified by quotations from their 
writings, from Hippocrates to Lister. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE 

Lecturer — P. M. Macdonnell, M.A., M.D., C.M. 

Lecturer — T. J. RiGNEY, B.A., K.C. 

Fifth Year 

The course in Jurisprudence includes the following: legal criminal 
procedure; Coroner ^s court; medical evidence, identity; modes of dying; 
sudden death, signs of death; homicide, suicide; wounds, burns and 
scalds; suffocation, hanging and strangling; drowning; death from 
starvation, cold and heat, lightning and electricity; marriage and di- 
vorce; offences against chastity; pregnancy and delivery; criminal 
abortion; infanticide, causes of death to the foetus; legitimacy, im- 
potence, sterility; malingering and feigned diseases; survivorship, life 
assurance, wills, malpractice; Workmen’s Compensation Act. 

A short course deals with Toxicology or the science of poisons 
embracing the detection and treatment of criminal and accidental cases. 

Books of Reference 

Taylor; Hamilton; Peterson, Haines and Webster; Buchanan; Sid- 
ney Smith; Glaister. 

MEDICINE AND CLINICAL MEDICINE 

Professor - _ - W. T. Connell, M.D., F.R.C.P. (C.) 

Associate Professor — Wm. Gibson, M.D., F.R.C.P. (C.) 

Assistant Professor — B. H. Hopkins, M.B. 

Lecturer - - - J. R. Third, B.A., M.D. 

Lecturer - - - W. Ford Connell, M.D., M.R.C.P. (Lond.) 

Clinical Assistant — J. S. Delahaye, M.D. 

Clinical Assistant — C. W. Bennett, M.D. 

Fellow - - - - W. J. Houghtling, M.D. 

Fellow _ - - - s. Robinson, M.D. 


^ 59 — 


Fourth Year 

1. Physical Diagnosis. 

The course covers the methods of examination of patients, including 
the principles and methods of physical diagnosis. Two hours per week 
are spent on this work. 

2. Infectious Diseases. 

By way of introduction to the study of Medical diseases, lectures 
are given one hour weekly on the Infectious Diseases. Opportunity is 
taken to show examples of these conditions in the wards cnf the Isolation 
and General Hospitals. 

3. Metabolic Diseases. 

In association with the class work in Pathological Chemistry, one 
hour per week is devoted to the clinical discussion of the Diseases of 
Metabolism. 

Fifth Year 

The work of the fifth year is mainly clinical. Students are re- 
quired to work in the wards under the supervision of the Fellows in 
Medicine, and to prepare a number of clinical cases during the ses- 
sion. The class is divided into small sections for ward teaching on 
which several hour periods are spent each week. 

A review of the main systemic diseases, their etiology, course, 
symptoms, diagnosis and treatment is also carried out during the ses- 
sion. 

Sixth Year 

Work during this year is carried on in the Hospital wards and by 
clinical demonstrations in the lecture theatre. 

Text-Books 

Clinical Methods and Casetaking: 

Cabot, Physical Diagnosis’, Horder and Gow, Essentials of Medical 
Diagnosis’, Hutchison and Hunter, Clinical Methods’, Bourne, Medi- 
cal History and Casetaking’, Foster; Emerson. 

Practice of Medicine: 

Conybeare; Price; Cecil; Musser; Osier and McCrae. 

Skin Diseases: 

Dore and Franklin, Common Diseases of the Skin; MacKenna, 
Skin Diseases; Walker, Introduction to Dermatology; Sequeira, 
Skin Diseases; Andrews, S/cm Diseases; Semon and Moritz, An 
Atlas of the Commoner Skin Diseases. 


— 60 — 


Nervous Diseases: 

Grinker, Neurology) Brain, Diseases of the Nervous System) 
Wechsler, Clinical Neurology) Purves Stewart, The Diagnosis of 
Nervous Diseases. 

Heart Diseases: 

Lewis, Diseases of the Heart) White, Heart Disease) MacKenzie, 
Diseases of the Heart. 

Therapy: 

Beckman, Treat7nent in General Practice ; Bellingham-Smith and 
Feiling, Modern Medical Treatment) Rudolph, Medical Treatment 
of Disease. 

Dietetics : 

McLester, Nutrition and Diet in Health and Disease) Harrop, 
Diet in Disease. 

Endocrinology: 

Goldzieher, Practical Endocrinology. 

Books of Reference 

French, Differential Diagnosis) Tidy, Index of Symptomatology) 
Ker, Infectious Diseases) Rolleston, Infectious Diseases) Norris and 
Landis, Diseases of the Chest) Savill, Clinical Medicine) International 
Clinics (Lippincott) ; Rabinovitch, Diabetes Mellitus) Lawrence, The 
Diabetic Life. 

OBSTETRICS 

Professor - - - G. W. Mylks, M.D., C.M., F.A.C.S., F.R.C.S. (C) 
Assistant Professor F. J. O’Connor, M.D., C.M. 

Assistant Po-ofessor Presley A. McLeod, B.A., M.D., C.M. 

Clinical Assistants P. H. Huyck, M.D., C.M. 

C. W. Bennett, M.D., C.M. 

For fifth year students the course in Obstetrics includes the anat- 
omy of the pelvis; anatomy, anatomical relations and physiology of the 
organs of generation; menstruation, ovulation and conception; develop- 
ment of the embryo, foetus and fcetal appendages; the diagnosis of 
pregnancy, phenomena and management of normal labor; management 
of the mother and infant during the puerperal period; mechanism and 
management of labor for the several presentations; twin pregnancy and 
labor. 

Sixth Year 

In the sixth year the pathology of pregnancy, parturition and the 
puerperium is taken up. Under this heading are considered the diseases 
of the membranes and placenta; the diseases and disorders of preg- 


—61 


nancy; the effects of certain diseases on pregnancy and parturition; 
mensuration of the pelvis; dystocias resulting from deformed pelvis; 
faulty mechanism, mal-presentations and positions; ante partum and 
post partum hemorrhage; diseases incident to the puerperium; and 
obstetric surgery. The lectures are illustrated by the artificial pelvis, 
drawings and models. The class is admitted to the practice of the 
maternity wards of the Hospital and Hotel Dieu, where practical in- 
struction is given in the management and care of such cases. During 
the session also, the class is taken in sections for drill with the man- 
nikin, and for instruction in other branches of clinical work. The 
sections and the two-hour periods are arranged at the beginning of the 
session. 

Books of Reference 

Williams; Eden; De Lee; Polak; Jellett and Madill; Johnstone; 
Bourne: Synopsis Obstetrics and Gynaecology; Obstetrics by Ten 
Teachers. 

PATHOLOGY 

Professor — James Miller, M.D., D.Sc., F.R.C.P.Ed., F.R.C.P.(C), 

F.R.S.C. 

Assistant Professor — W. D. Hay, M.A., M.D., C.M. 

Assistant Curators of Museum — C. D. T. Mundell, B.Com., M.D., C.M., 

and Gordon Mylks, B.A., M.D., C.M. 

Richardson Fellow in Pathology — H. J. Tweddell, M.D., C.M. 

Fourth Year 

1. General Pathology. Students of the fourth year attend a course 
of lectures and demonstrations in General Pathology covering three 
hours per week. Two additional hours per week are spent in the lab- 
oratory studying microscopic preparations illustrating the matter dis- 
cussed in the lectures. 

2. Clinical Microscopy. Three hours per week are spent in chemical 
and microscopical examination of urine, blood, gastric contents, faeces, 
exudates, transudates, cerebro-spinal fluid, and animal parasites. 

Books — Text: Muir, Miller, Nicholson; Reference: Boyd, MacCal- 
lum, Delafield and Prudden. 

Fifth Year 

3. Pathology and Morbid Anatomy. Students of the fifth ^ear at- 
tend a series of lectures and demonstrations in Pathology and Morbid 
Anatomy occupying five hours per week during the session. Two hours 
are devoted to lectures, two to practical work, mainly microscopic in 
character, and one to museum work. 


—62- 


Students in rotation assist in making autopsies and are required to 
furnish during the course of the fourth, fifth and sixth years reports on 
eight cases, including in these reports the clinical history, morbid ana- 
tomy and histology and pathology of the case, along with a critical 
review of the pathogenesis and the causes of death. Two of the cases 
must be handed in during the fourth year, three in the fifth and three 
in the sixth. These cases are marked and annotated by the members 
oif the medical, surgical and pathological staffs, and the marks obtained 
recorded. No student is allowed to complete his course who has not 
obtained at least 60% of marks over the whole series. 

Books — Texts: Muir; Wright, or Hewlett; Hadfield and Garrod, 
Recent Advances in Pathology. 

Sixth Year 

4. A course of lectures and practical work, three hours per week 
in Serology is given during the latter half of the session. This course 
is intended to prepare the practitioner for sending in material to a 
public health laboratory and for the interpretation of the reports. The 
matters of carrying out of skin tests, the preparation and use of vac- 
cines and immune sera are also dealt with practically. 

Books — Reference: Kolmer, Boyd, Hadfield and Garrod. 

Clinico-pathological Conferences. — Conferences on medical and sur- 
gical cases in their clinical, pathological and bacteriological aspects are 
held each Saturday morning throughout the session. These are open to 
students of the fourth, fifth and sixth years. The cases brought up 
at these conferences form the basis of the reports mentioned above. 

PEDIATRICS 

Professor of Pediatrics- — R. R. MacGregor, M.D., F.R.C.P. (C.) 

Fifth Year 

This course includes the general care and management of infants, 
clinical investigation of diseases in infants, injuries and diseases of the 
newly born, infant feeding, derangements of nutrition, diseases due to 
faulty nutrition, diseases of the digestive system, respiratory diseases, 
acute infectious diseases, and practical demonstration of the prepara- 
tion of infant foods. 

Sixth Year 
Clinics 

Text-books : Holt, Grulee. 

Books of Reference 

Still, Hutchison, Griffith, Thompson, Dennett, Talbot and Morse, 
Porter and Carter, Feer. 


—63— 


PHARMACOLOGY, MATERIA MEDICA, PHARMACY AND 
THERAPEUTICS 

Douglas Professor of Therapeutics— Gibson, M.A., 
M. B., C.M. (Edin.), F.R.C.P.(C.) 

Lecturer — Eldon M. Boyd, M.A., M.D., C.M. 

The lecture course deals with the dynamic action of drugs upon 
the various parts of the body. An effort is made to exemplify these 
effects by citation of cases observed in medical practice. The value of 
endocrines in treatment, according to present knowledge, is discussed. 
Forms of administering drugs are illustrated throughout the course by 
the writing and discussion of prescriptions in weekly class exercises. 

At the beginning of the course some demonstrations are given 
of pharmaceutical methods of preparing drugs for use, pharmacal 
methods of compounding, and incompatibilities. 

In the experimental course, the actions of typical drugs are observed 
upon the living tissues of frogs, guinea pigs, and rabbits. 

The Professor of Pharmacology and Therapeutics lectures once a 
week to fifth and sixth year students, taking up the treatment of certain 
medical diseases. 

Relevant monographs or articles in systems are referred to as oc- 
casion arises. 

Books of Reference 

Pharmacology: Cushny, Dixon, Sollman, Meyer and Gottlieb. 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics: Bastedo, Bruce and Billing, 
Whitla. 


PHYSICS 

Professor — J. K. Robertson, M.A., F.R.S.C. 

Lecturers — B. W. Sargent, Ph.D., E. E. Watson, B.Sc., Ph.D. 

Assistant — C. W. Clapp, B.Sc. 

First Year 

1. Elementary Physics. 

(a) A course of three lectures per week throughout the year. The 
course includes lectures on Statics, Dynamics, Properties of Matter, 
Heat, Sound and Light. Special emphasis is given to such subjects as 
Surface Tension, Osmotic Pressure, and some of the physical properties 
of Colloidal Solutions. While the course is one on the fundamental 
laws of Physics, examples of the application of these laws to Medicine 
are introduced wherever it seems advisable to do so. 


—64- 


(6) Two hours per week in the laboratory. 

Text-book: Stewart, Physics (Ginn & Co.). 

Second Year 

2. Electricity and Magnetism, Conduction of Electricity through 

Gases, Roentgen Rays and Radioactivity. 

(a) A course of two lectures per week in which a thorough ele- 
mentary treatment of the above subjects is given. In the latter half 
of the course the lectures are designed to familiarize the student with 
modern X-ray equipment and its operation, as well as with the physical 
nature of radiations of therapeutic value. 

(b) Laboratory — Two hours per week. 

Text-books : — 

Stewart: Physics (Ginn & Co.). 

Robertson: X-Rays and X-Ray Apparatus (.Macmillan, N.Y.). 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor — G. Spencer Melvin, M.D., Aberd. 

Associate Professor and Lecturer in Embryology — 

G. H. Ettinger, B.A., M.D., C.M. 

Second Year 

1. Histology. The earlier part of the course consists of a detailed 
study of the principal tissues of the body. Preparations of these are 
made and examined in the fresh condition and in mounted specimens. 
This is followed by a study of the structure of the organs of the body. 
In the laboratory the student is trained in the technique of the different 
methods of making microscopic preparations and each student must cut, 
stain and mount a number of sections from fresh material. For this 
work the class is divided into small sections which work under the im- 
mediate supervision of the staff at hours to be arranged. 

A complete collection of mounted slides is supplied. 

Text-books : — J ordan : Histology. 

Schafer: Essentials of Histology. 

2. Embryology. The course consists of one lecture period and two 
hours' laboratory work per week on the embryology of the chick and pig 

Text-books: — Lillie and Moore: A Laboratory Outline of Embryo- 
logy. 

Arey: Developmental Anatomy. 

Jordan and Kindred: A Text Book of Embryology. 

Frazer: Manual of Embryology. 


—65— 


Third Year 

3. Experimental Physiology. This is a laboratory course in the 
dynamics of muscle and nerve, nervous system, circulation and respira- 
tion, digestion, excretion, secretion, etc. 

Text-book: — Schafer: Experimental Physiology. 

4. Physiology. The subject is treated systematically and is supple- 
mented by demonstrations and by the work in the experimental class. 
Special emphasis is laid on the application of Physiology to clinical 
study. 

Text-books: — Starling: Human Physiology. 

Howell: Text-hook of Physiology. 

MacLeod: Physiology and Biochemistry in Modern 
Medicine. 

5. Histology. The class meets in small sections for review, and 
tutorial instruction is given in special methods of microscopic technique. 

Optional Courses 

6. Research in Physiology. Properly qualified students are admit- 
ted to the laboratory for post-graduate study and special research. 

Books of Reference 

Howell, Starling, Schafer, Luciani, Bayliss; Evans: Recent Advances in 
Physiology. Quain: Microscopic Anatomy. Schafer: The Endocrine Or- 
gans. Cannon: Mechanical Factors of Digestion. Pavlov: Work of the 
Digestive Glands. Sherrington: Integrative Action of the Nervous Sys- 
tem.. Wright: Applied Physiology. Quain: Embryology. Vincent: 
Internal Secretions and the Ductless Glands. Lillie: Development of the 
Chick. Bailey and Miller: Text-hook of Embryology. McMurrich: De- 
velopment of the Human Body. Keith: Human Embryology and Mor- 
phology. Kellicott: Elements of Chordate Development. Keibel and 
Mall: Embryology. Gray’s Anatomy, Section on Embryology. Patten: 
Development of the Chick. Marshall: Physiology of Reproduction. 

PUBLIC HEALTH AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 

The Arthur R. Elliott Professor — John Wyllie, M.A., M.B., 

Ch.B., B.Sc. (Glasgow), 
D.P.H. (Cambridge) . 

Lecturer — J. S. Delahaye, M.D., C.M. 

Lecture Course: 

The following subjects are discussed and illustrated with lantern 
slides: — air and ventilation, heating and lighting, water and water 
supply, domestic and community sanitation, food and food infections, 


— 66 — 


control of infectious disease, specific infections, industrial hygiene, 
insect-borne diseases, maternity and child welfare, school hygiene, ven- 
ereal diseases, tuberculosis and vital statistics. 

Practical Course : 

Outdoor visits to Public Health Schemes are arranged during the 
term September to December in the 5th year. The visits include in- 
spection of Water Supply Schemes, Sewage Disposal Schemes, Ventilat- 
ing and Heating Systems in schools, colleges and factories, an Incinera- 
tor plant, a model Summer cottage, a Relief camp, a model Dairy 
farm, a Pasteurizing plant, a Storage-battery plant and a Printing 
press. 

Laboratory demonstrations of chemical and bacteriological analyses 
@f water and milk are also given. 

Opportunities are afforded of attending a Maternity and Child 
Welfare clinic and a Mental Health clinic. 

Medical students in their 5th year of study attend a course of 
didactic lectures during the term September to December, dealing with 
the sanitary aspects of Public Health in conjunction with the outdoor 
visits. 

The expenses incurred in the outdoor visits, along with the cost 
of material supplied in class to each student, are deducted from the 
sessional deposit. 

Medical students in their 6th year of study attend a course of 
didactic lectures on the preventive aspects of disease during the term 
January to April. Laboratory demonstrations are given of methods 
for the detection of poisons and preservatives in foods, and microscopical 
exhibits of parasites in meat and the chief insect vectors of disease. 

Students are advised to undertake reading in preparation for an 
essay on “The Advantages of Periodic Health Examinations” during 
their 5th year. A prize is awarded yearly for the best essay submitted 
before the end of April by a final year student. 

Books of Reference 

Currie: Text-book of Hygiene. Fitzgerald: Introduction to the 
Practice of Preventive Medicine. Rosenau: Preventive Medicine and 
Hygiene. 


—67— 


PSYCHIATRY 

Professor — T. D. Cumberland, M.B. (Toronto). 

Clinical Assistants — C. M. Crawford, B.A., M.D., C.M., F.A.C.P. 
C. A. Buck, M.D. 

Instruction in Psychiatry is given in both fifth and sixth years. 

In the fifth year it consists of: — 

Lectures and demonstrations in psychopathology and abnormal 
psychology having an especial bearing upon the psychoses and psycho- 
neuroses. In this course an attempt will be m.ade to demonstrate to 
the student the abnormalities of the various psychological functions, the 
constitutional reaction types, the personality deviations and the com- 
moner mental mechanisms. 

Instruction in the sixth year will consist of: — 

Lectures and clinics outlining the symptom-complexes shown in the 
various forms of mental disorder. This course will be made largely 
clinical and will be illustrated extensively from the abundant material 
available in the wards of the Ontario Hospital. Special emphasis will 
be given to the psychiatric components of general medical and surgical 
diseases and to the somatic factors in the various mental disorders. 

Text-hooks in Psychiatry : — 

Henderson and Gillespie: Text-hook of Psychiatry. White: Outlines 
of Psychiatry. Strecker and Ebaugh: Practical Clinical Psychiatry. 
Bleuler: Text-hook of Psychiatry. Rosanoff: Manual of Psychiatry. 
Craig and Beaton: Psychological Medicine. 

Text-hooks in Abnormal Psychology '. — 

Bridges: Psychology, Normal and Abnormal, 1930. Fisher: Intro- 
duction to Abnormal Psychology, 1929. McDougall: Outline of Abnor- 
mal Psychology, 1926. 


PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor — George Humphrey, M.A., Ph.D. 

Lecturer — C. M. Crawford, B.A., M.D., C.M., F.A.C.P. 

Second Year 

The course in Psychology for second year students consists of lec- 
tures and clinical demonstrations, the material for which is obtained 
from the wards of the Ontario Hospital, Kingston. An attempt is made 
to present the subject both from the introspectionist and behaviouristic 


— 68 — 


points of view. Such subjects are covered as: sensation, perception, 
memory, attention, psychological types and intelligence. The clinical 
demonstrations are held at the Ontario Hospital, and opportunity is 
afforded for a complete discussion of all problems raised by the cases 
presented. This course is in preparation of the students for a later 
course in psychopathology which is given in connection with the course 
in psychiatry. 

Text-hooks recommended: 

Pillsbury: Essentials of Psychology, 1930 edition (.Macmillan). 

J. W. Bridges: Psychology, Normal and Abnormal, 1929 edition. 

(Appleton). 

Woodworth: Psychology, 1929 ed. (Holt). 

Carr, H. A.: Psychology (Longmans, Green & Co. 1925). 


RADIOLOGY AND PHYSICAL THERAPY 
Professor— W. A. Jones, M.D., F.R.C.P.(C.) 

Fifth Year 

The course in radiology is of one hour weekly in practical radio- 
graphy and film reading. 

One hour a week is used for classes in Physical Therapy. These 
classes include lectures on, and demonstrations of all the standard 
physical therapeutic measures. 

Sixth Year 

One hour each week is used for lectures in radiology and in prac- 
tical film interpretation. 

Books of Reference 

Baetjer and Waters: Injuries and Diseases of Bones and Joints. 
McKendrick and Whittaker: An X-Ray Atlas of the Body. Carman: 
The Roentgen Diagnosis of Diseases of the Alimentary Canal. Braasch: 
Urography. Holmes and Ruggles: Roentgen Interpretation. Massey: 
Practical Electro Therapeutics and Diathermy. Rhinehart: Roentgeno- 
graphic Technique. Russel and Russel: Ultra Violet Radiation and 
Actinotherapy. Kaplan: Practical Radiation Therapy. 


—69— 


SURGERY 

Professor - - - L. J. Austin, M.Ch., F.R.C.S. (C.) , 

F.R.C.S. 

Associate Prof essor — F. Etherington, M.D., F.R.C.S. (C.) 

Associate Prof essor — I. G. Bogart, M.D., F.R.C.S. (C.) 

Associate Prof essor— 3 . F. Sparks, B.A., M.D., F.R.C.S. (C ) 

Assistant Prof essor — S. J. Keyes, M.D., F.R.C.S. (C.) 

Assistant Prof essor — N. E. Berry, M.D.(in charge of Urology). 

Assistant Prof essor — S. W. Houston, M.D., F.R.C.S. (Edin.) , 
F.R.C.S. (C.) 

Lecturer - - - — D. W. Boucher, M.D., F.R.C.S. (Edin.) . 

Fellow in Surgery — C. D. T. Mundell, M.D., C.,M. 

Fourth Year 

The student is first brought in contact with hospital cases in the 
fourth year. 

Fifth Year 

In the fifth year clinics are held at the General Hospital, Hotel Dieu 
and Ontario Hospital, and the work of this year is almost entirely 
clinical. Special instruction is also given in operative work in which 
the students assist in rotation and a few lectures are delivered on sys- 
tematic surgery. 

Sixth Year 

The sixth year is devoted chiefly to clinical surgery. 

Special courses are also given at the General Hospital in the use 
of the cystoscope and uretral catherization by Dr. Berry and in anes- 
thesia by Dr. Keyes. 

Clinics are held at the Kingston General Hospital, Rockwood Hos- 
pital and Hotel Dieu. In addition every possible opportunity is afforded 
the student throughout the session to attend operations performed by 
the members of the staff at the different hospitals, a limited number of 
the students being permitted to view the operation from the floor. 
Operative Surgery. 

A special class in Operative Surgery is held for 10 weeks during 
the final year. Amputations and such other operations as may be de- 
monstrated on the cadaver are performed by the students in rotation. 

Approved Text-Books 

Rose and Carless, Thompson and Miles. Whitman: Orthopedic 
Surgery. Pye: Surgical Handicraft. Wilson and Cochrane: Fractures. 
Horsley: Operative Surgery. Choyce: System of Surgery. Bickham: 
Surgery (6 vols.), Nelson’s Surgery. Lewis: Practice of Surgery. 
Walton: Surgical Diagnosis. Surgical Clinics of North America. Gra- 
ham: Surgical Diagnosis. Campbell: Orthopedic Surgery. Kirschner: 
Operative) Da Costa: Modern Surgery. Mock, Pemberton and Coulter: 
Therapy. 


DEGREES CONFERRED 


Degrees Conferred at the Annual Convocation, May, 1934 


Benjamin Jonathan Alperin 
John Edmund Baker 
Henry Elmer Drew Bateman 
Philip Harris Bernstein 
Victor A. Cecilioni 
Arthur Paul Carman Clark 
Robert Wilfred Moss Clark 
William Thompson Clark 
Arthur Samuel Crummey 
Colmer Bruce Davis 
Frederick William E^g:ert 
Frederick George Elliott 
Charles Fred Galway 
Jack Edward Gorman 
Foster James Hamilton 
William Adrian Hargrove 
James Sheldon Hazen 
Joseph Douglas Hermann 
Joseph Edward Josephson 
Lionel Eugene Limoges 
Donald Ian Matheson, B.A. 


James Gilbert McBroom 
Cyril Hugh McGowan 
William Napoleon McKee 
Malcolm Hector McKinnon, B.A, 
Hugh McKinnon, M.B. 

Neil Edward Morrison 
Norman Irwin McLeod, B.A. 
Robert Randolph Mutrie 
Thomas Edmund Nugent 
Maurice Joseph O’Connor 
Robert Edward Ralph 
Leonard Arthur Remus 
Ernest Arthur Sanders 
William Robert Ian Slack 
Robert Angus Stewart 
Thomas Glen Stoddart 
Reginald Earl Taft 
Henry James Tweddell 
Edwin Perry White 
George Francis Wilcock 
Wing Yuen Wong 


Degrees Conferred in the Fall of 1934 

Louis Baker 

Albert Moore Glover 

John Emerson McIntosh 


— 70 — 


MEDALISTS AND HOLDERS OF SCHOLARSHIPS 
AND PRIZES 


Medalists in Medicine 

1931 John T. Tweddell 1933 Robert Johnston 

1932 Eldon M. Boyd 1934 Henry James Tweddell 

Medalists in Surgery 

1931 Michael W. C. Feeney 1933 Samuel Robinson 

1932 Kenneth A. Roberts 1934 Neil Edward Morrison 

The N. F. Dupuis Scholarship 

1931 Perry E. White 1933 James B. Roberts 

1932 Harold Frank 1934 Felix Stein, B.A. 

The New York Alumni Association Scholarship 

1931 Harold Frank 1933 Garnet W. Zealand 

1932 James B. Roberts 1934 George Malcolm Brown 

The Dean Fowler Scholarship 

1931 Robert Johnston 1933 Frederick H. Bonnell 

1932 Neil E. Morrison 1934 Thomas Neil Tweddell 

The Robert Bruce Scholarship 

1931 James B. Roberts 1933 Clifford G. Campbell 

1932 Edward D. Rooke 1934 Donald Cameron Macdonald 

The David Edward Mundell Prize 

1931 James D. Allen 1934 Philip Harris Bernstein and 

1932 Kenneth A. Roberts Leonard Arthur Remus 

1933 Robert Johnston (equal) 

The Reuben Leonard Wells Scholarship 
1933 Wing Yuen Wong 1934 William Ivison Taylor 

Faculty Scholarships 

1931 Charles E. Conners and Hugo T. Ewart (equal), and Kenneth A. 

Roberts. 

1932 Thomas N. Tweddell and Robert Johnston. 

1933 Thomas C. Wilson and Wing Y. Wong. 

1934 Ernest Anderson Johnson and William Ivison Taylor. 


— 71 — 


—72— 


Canadian National Committee for Mental Hygiene Prize 

1931 Clarence A. Buck 

1932 K. A. Roberts 

1933 Robert Johnston 

1934 Edwin Perry White 

The Boak Scholarship 

1931 Wing Y. Wong 

1932 Harold Frank 

1933 James B. Roberts 

1934 Harry Victor Morris 

Dr. M. James’ Prize 

1931 John T. Tweddell 1933 Robert Johnston 

1932 E. M. Boyd 1934 Neil Edward Morrison 

Ontario Medical Association Prize in Preventive Medicine 

1932 J. B. Ewing 1934 Edwin Perry White 

1933 Morton B. George 

Professor’s Prize in Medicine and Clinical Medicine 

1931 James D. Allen 1933 Benjamin R. Susman, B.A. 

1932 K. A. Roberts 1934 Henry James Tweddell 

Professor’s Prize for the Best Series of Pathological Cases 

1931 John T. Tweddell 1934 Henry James Tweddell 

1932 E. M. Boyd Joseph Edward Josephson 

1933 Douglas B. Summers and Victor A. Cecilioni 

Robert Johnston, equal Thomas Glen Stoddart 

(equal) 

The D. T. Smith Prize in Pharmacology 

1931 Robert Johnston 1933 Cecil H. Wilson 

1932 Philip Bernstein 1934 Thomas Neil Tweddell 

Professor’s Prize in Surgery and Clinical Surgery 

1931 John T. Tweddell 1933 Robert Johnston 

1932 R. C. Burr 1934 William Thompson Clark and 

Wing Yuen Wong (equal) 

Professor’s Prize in Preventive Medicine 

1931 M. W. C. Feeney 1933 Benjamin R. Susman, B,A. 

1932 L. R. LeFave 1934 Henry James Tweddell and 

Philip Bernstein (equal) 


STUDENTS IN ATTENDANCE 

SESSION 1934-1935 


Sixth Year 


Robert E. C. Anderson 
Albert P. Asselstine . 
James H. Bateman . . 

Donald C. Bews 

Frederick H. Bonnell . 
Joseph E. Boucher . . . . 

John V. Byrne 

Nicholas M. Comodo . . 
Charles E. Conners . . 
Osier B. Dickinson . . . 
Antoine J. Dubreuil . . 
William J. Earle .... 
George R. F. Elliot . . 
Hugo T. Ewart, B.A. 

John C. Finley 

Harold Frank 

Wm. E. Glass 

John H. Hamlin . . . . . 
Edwin G. Johnston . . 

James A. Kidd 

Charles H. Leavens . . 

John S. Ledwell 

Horace A. C. Leigh . . 
George H. Lewis .... 

Clair J. Locke 

Allen G. Minnes 

John B. McCarthy . . . . 

Paul J. Miranti 

Amer H. Moore 

H. Harold Moore .... 
Ronald B. Murray . . . 

John V. Nelles 

Mervyn G. Peever . . . , 
J. Harold G. Preston . 
Everett F. Raynor . . . 
Thomas C. Robinson . . 


Ashton 

Fernie, B.C. 

Thomasburg 

Kingston 

Victoria, B.C. 

North Chelmsford, Mass. 

Perth 

Hartford, Conn. 

Carleton Place 

Port Hope 

Berlin, N.H. 

Smith’s Falls 

Corbin, B.C. 

Petrolia 

Meaford 

Montreal, Que. 

Hamilton 

Toronto 

Lansdowne 

London 

Kingston 

. . . Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

Kingston 

Ottawa 

Brinston 

Kingston 

Kingston 

Jersey City, N.J. 

North Bay 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Owen Sound 

Hamilton 

Renfrew 

Ottawa 

Victoria, B.C. 

Brockville 


— 73 — 


— 74 — 


Henry R. Ruttan 

William Stewart 

William I. Taylor 

Donald W. A. Templeton 

Cyril G. Teskey 

Michael Tuchtie 

Gerald C. Walker 

Peter Wenger 

Cecil H. Wilson 

William J. Yarmey . . . . 


Brentwood Bay, B.C. 

Brockville 

Lindsay 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Sarniia 

Hamilton 

Kingston 

Fort William 

Godfrey 

Canora, Sask. 


Fifth Year 


Michael Baptist Adams 

James B. Arthurs 

John E. Bedard 

Gavin W. Blenkinsop . . , 
Sidney Brownstone . . . . 

Clive B. Caswell 

Leonard E. Cohen 

Colin S. Dafoe 

John S. Davies 

Francis R. Donnelly . . 

Frank E. Earle 

J ohn L. Etherington . . . 

Keith C. Falkner 

Anton Forsberg 

Charles Galloway 

Benjamin Gencher 

Emanuel Gherman . . . . 
John G. Goodfellow . . . . 
Gerald H. Graham . . . . 
Leigh S. Greenfield . . . . 

Eldon T. Green 

Harry T. Hogan 

Richard C. Hughes .... 

Leslie S. Jolliffe 

Irving Levitt 

John A. M. McCue .... 
William C. McIntosh . . . 

John F. McNichol 

Geo. M. Malone 

William E. Millard .... 

John G. Murphy 

Fergus J. O’Connor . . . 


Hamilton 

Parry Sound 

Gananoque 

Truro, N.S. 

Plum Coulee, Man. 

Wolfe Island 

Perth 

Madoc 

Willowdale 

Stanleyville 

Prescott 

Hamilton 

.Ogdensburg, N.Y. 
Temiskaming, Que. 

Woodville 

Ottawa 

Kingston 

Superior, Wise. 

..Sherbrooke, N.S. 
. . . .Fairport, N.Y. 

Kingston 

. . Saskatoon, Sask. 

Brockville 

Kingston 

. . . Limerick, Sask. 

Smith’s Falls 

Smith’s Falls 

Ottawa 

Regina. Sask. 

Kingston 

Fort William 

Kingston 


■ 75 — 


Richard R. Patterson 

Nelson Perea 

James B. Roberts . . . 
Raymond F. Ross . . 
Kenneth H. Running 
John L. Shappert . . 
Charles PI. Shaver . 
Irwin Sugarman . . . 
Albert E. Thoms . . . 
Thomas N. Tweddell 
Lindsay 0. Watt . . . 
Stephen A, Yaffe . . . 

Allen C. Young 

Joseph E. Zbar .... 


Kingston 

Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 

Lanark 

Belleville 

Smith’s Falls 

Goodeve, Sask. 

Chatham 

Kingston 

Arnprior 

Kingston 

Ottawa 

Hamilton 

Grimsby Beach 

Kingston 


Fourth Year 


Charles J. Austin . . . . 
William A. Bearden . . 
Donald McK. F. Biehn . 
Murray R. Bowie .... 
George D. Caldbick . . . . 

John R. Card 

Gordon C. Caughey . . 

Frank S. Clarke 

Clair J. Countryman . 

John E. Dalton 

Joseph S. Delaney .... 

Lome C. Dickson 

Robert J. Dooley 

Walter J. Elliot 

H. David Freeman . . . . 
James S. Goodbrand .. 

Edward Kahn 

Robert G. Laidlaw .... 
Reginald R. Laird . . . . 
W. M. Stuart Lauder 
M. Earle MacDonald . . 
Geo. W. E. MacPherson 
Ross M. McCullough . . 
John W. McDougall . . . 
Michael G. McGuire . . 

Macdonald McKee 

John P. McManus . . . . 
Charles R. Marcellus . 


Fernie, B.C. 

. . Abernethy, Sask. 
. . Parry Sound, Ont. 

Ottawa 

. . . .Haileybury, Ont. 

Guelph, Ont. 

. . Ameliasburg, Ont. 
Kirkland Lake, Ont. 

Belleville 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Prescott, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Corbin, B.C. 

Kingston, Ont. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Kingston, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Penticton, B.C. 

. . . .Vancouver, B.C. 
...Point Anne, Ont. 

Carleton Place 

Kingston, Ont. 

.... Brockville, Ont. 

Smith’s Falls 

Kingston, Ont. 

..Bronx, New York 
Iroquois, Ont. 


— 76 — 


John H. Maurer . . . . 
Borden C. Miller . . 
Ralph G. Miller . . . . 
Harry V. Morris . . . 
Arthur B. Murphy . . 

Eric T. Mutrie 

R. Lloyd Nesbitt . . . 
William C. Powell . . 
Joseph A. Quigley . . 

Blake M. Reive 

Clifford R. Richmond 
Homer C. Rogers . . . 
Edward D. Rooke . . 

Jas. H. Shaw 

Herbert G. Smith . . 

Felix Stein 

Melville Swartz .... 
John E. Walker . . . . 
Thomas C. Wilson . . 
Garnet W. Zealand . . 


. . . .Jersey City, N.J. 

Kingston 

Port Arthur 

Trinity, Nfld 

. . Smith’s Falls, Ont. 

Guelph, Ont. 

Kingston, Ont. 

Elgin, Ont. 

Kingston, Ont. 

Welland, Ont. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Odessa 

Kingston, Ont. 

Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

..Fort William, Ont. 

Burlington 

..Iroquois Falls, Ont. 
Lindsay, Ont. 


Third Year 


William E. Allison 

Harry L. Alpert 

Roger M. Billings 

Shirley E. Bishop 

William G. Breckenridge 
George M. Brown . . . . . 

Claude F. Cahill 

Colin A. Campbell 

Clifford G. Campbell . . . 

William E. Collins 

Harold W. N. Conran . 

Robt. B. Copeland 

Vincent A. Corrigan . . . 

George W. Currie 

Maurice C. Dinberg . . . . 

Allan R. Doane 

Thomas J. Elliott 

William J. Ewen 

Clifford W. Forsyth . . . . 

J oseph Giardina 

John J. Gibson 

Lawrence M. Gibson .... 


Camden, N.Y. 

Syracuse, N.Y. 

Cayuga 

Kentville, N.S. 

Peterboro 

Kingston 

Moncton, N.B. 

St. Thomas 

Owen Sound 

Beachburg 

Chapel’s Cove, Nfld. 

Lindsay 

Kingston 

Picton 

Ogdensburg N.Y. 

Iroquois 

Galahad, Alberta 

Montego Bay, Jamaica, B.W.I. 

Ottawa 

Niagara Falls 

Penticton, B.C. 

Kingston 


— 77 — 


Marshall M. Gowland 
Roland C. V. Gray . . . 
Vincent O. Hart . . . . , 
Ernest A. Johnson .. 
Richard A. Kelly . . . . 

Harry V. Kroll 

Jacob Kussner 

Harold D. Latham . . . 

Alfred J. Legris 

John A. Macdonald . . 
Edward G. Mack .... 

David S. Malen 

John A. McIntyre . . . 
Arthur L. Magill .... 
John R. E. M or den . . 
Harry A. L. Murphy . 
Frederick D. McDade . 
Joseph F. A. McManus 

Murray E. Oliver 

Douglas H. Pollock . 
Wallace A. Rupert . . . 

Edward J. Ryan 

Louis Segal 

Hugh G. Skinner 

Austin E. Smith 

Jack D. Sprague 

James M. Waddell . . . , 

Jack R. Webber 

Joseph D. Worral . . . . 
Hallam G. Young . . . . 

James S. Young 

Louis Zacks 


Milton 

New Westminster, B.C. 

. . . Napanee 

Smith’s Falls 

Delta 

Montreal Que. 

Cochrane 

Brockville 

Port Arthur 

Kincolith, B.C. 

Hamilton 

Outremont, Que. 

Lanark 

Smith’s Falls 

. Walkerville 

Stayner 

. . . .McAdam Jet., N.B. 

Bronx, New York 

Saskatoon 

Cochrane 

Brockville 

Crystal Beach 

Lynn, Mass. 

Bashaw, Alberta 

Kingston 

Springfield, N.S. 

Parry Sound 

Houlton, Maine 

Hamilton 

Seeley’s Bay 

Walkerville 

Peterboro 


Second Year 


William Amodeo Kingston 

James J. Barry Prescott 

Robert Glen Bell Cayuga 

Stanley John Bociek Hamilton 

James Ralph Clark Peterboro 

Kenneth James Clark Kingston 

Arthur Douglas Clilf Kingston 

Theodore Henry Coffey Moncton, N.B. 

Thomas Ray Colden Belleville 

Charles William Elliott Danby Kingston 


— 78 — 


Alfred Burton Dixon 

Thomas George Taylor Davis 

Horace B. Ellsworth 

George Herbert Emery 

Frederick Kenneth Guy .... 

Malcolm Beemer Hill 

Harold Vincent Hughes 

Robert Fowler Ingram 

John Arthur Irving 

Maurice Martin James 

John Leonard Johnston 

George Frederick A. Keopke . 

Israel Kornbluth 

George Eugene Large 

John Pius McCabe 

James Guthrie McCarroll . . . . 
Arthur Goodwin Macdonald . 
Donald Cameron MacDonald , 

John Macdonald 

William Kenneth MacDonald 
Timothy William McFarland 
Allan Francis McRoberts . . . 

Francis Martin 

Archibald John Medley .... 

Fritz Gerhard Moench 

Albert Edward Murley 

Rudolph Frank Ohlke 

Brendan M. A. O’Neil 

Stephen Paul Pakozdy , 

Alfredo Augusto Perea 

Richard Thomas Potter 

Eric Douglas Rathbone 

Anthony Brendan Reid . . . . . 

Lloyd George Reid 

Edgar Clifford Scharf 

David Scott 

George Ducolon Scott 

James Merritt Shapley 

Samuel Smolkin 

Vincent William Smith .... 

Henry Smyth 

James William Stevenson . . . 
Robert Bruce Sutherland . . 

John Tanton 

Harry LeRoy Thoman 


. . . New Britain, Conn. 

Gananoque 

Port Arthur 

Chatham 

Kingston 

Waterford 

Emerald, P.E.I. 

. . . Campbellton, N.B. 

Ottawa 

Kingston 

Kirkland Lake 

Pembroke 

Montreal, Que. 

Toronto 

Iona, P.E.I. 

Saint John, N.B. 

Kincolith, B.C. 

Ceylon, Sask. 

Hamilton 

. Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

Kingston 

North Bay 

Chatham, N.B. 

.Kingston 

Kingston 

. . Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

Kingston 

. . Bay de Verde, Nfld. 

Welland 

Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 

Belleville 

Fort William 

Lansdowne 

Westmeath 

Kingston 

Ottawa 

Kingston 

Toronto 

Almonte 

Quebec, Que. 

. . . Green River, N.B. 

Kingston 

Freelton 

St. Marys 

Hamilton 


— 79 — - 

Gordon Karl Trotter Collingwood 

Ernest Alfred Watkinson Sault Ste. Marie 

Arthur Zuckerman Toronto 

First Year 

Russel John Alexander Iroquois Falls 

Bruce Falconer Anderson Stayner 

Sidney Ray Arber Tweed 

John Wilmer Browning Barr Lanark 

Cyril Kenneth Benson King 

Barney Bernstein Cochrane 

Ormond Howard Berry Seeley’s Bay 

Norman Donald Blair Arthur 

Penu Peneff Chalykoff Hearst 

Jas. Paul Ivan Clancy Semans, Sask. 

David Wesley Clare Brechin 

Francis John Clute Wyevale 

Bernard Michael Connolly Brockville 

Thomas Dalbert Cowper Ottawa 

James Jos. Cunningham New York, N.Y. 

Thomas Evans Currier Ottawa 

Malcolm Dingwall Kingston 

Frederick Clarence Dobie Port Arthur 

Hume Duggan St. David’s 

John Douglas Empson Cannifton 

Neil Robertson Erskine Monkton 

Gordon Ferguson Nelson, B.C. 

Robert Alexander Fortye Kingston, Ont. 

Gladstone Wm. Jacob Fiddes Kingston 

Norman Donald Garand Staten Island, N.Y. 

Neil Scott Gordon Ottawa 

Cecil Pierce Green Athens 

Joseph Greenblatt Ottawa 

Wm. Lloyd Grimshaw Toronto 

David Harold Merritt Hall Kingston 

Herbert Lewis Handford Renfrew 

William Sinclair Harper Port Perry 

George Eugene Hayunga New York, N.Y. 

Harold Dwight Holbrook Hamilton 

Robert Howard Holbrook Hamilton 

Jack Garner Jenkins Haileybury 

Howard Garfield Kelly Kingston 

Francis Eldon Kinsey Niagara Falls 

Robert Joseph Livesay Kingston 


—80— 

David McArel MacAuley Port Morien, Cape Breton 

Angus Alex. MacMillan Ottawa, Ont. 

James Burr McIntosh Chippawa 

Edwin Malcolm McLean Harrow 

Malcolm MacGregor Merrill Syracuse, N.Y. 

Franklin Tweedie Miles Belleville 

John Kitchener Moss Dundas 

Carman Benjamin Munro Carleton Place 

Donald Malcolm D. Murphy Kingston 

John Omar Patton Ottawa 

John Power Pearce Picton 

Robert Leslie Reeves Eganville 

Jos. Angus Robertson .. Campbellford 

Paul Scriven Rutherford Fort Erie 

William Lloyd Teskey Sarnia 

Reginald George Wedlake Brantford 

Donald Wendell Whyte Kingston 

Eric Albert Willis Seeley’s Bay 

John Robert Wilson Peterboro 

Bruce Harold Young Kemptville 

Frank Malcolm Young Seeley’s Bay 

SUMMARY 

Sixth Year 46 

Fifth Year 46 

Fourth Year 48 

Third Year 54 

Second Year 58 

First Year 60 


Total 312 


UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 


The following publications are issued by the University and, except 
where a price is mentioned, will be sent free of charge to all applicants. 

CALENDAR OF THE FACULTY OF ARTS. 

COURSES IN COMMERCE AND ADMINISTRATION. 

CALENDAR OF THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE. 

CALENDAR OF THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

CALENDAR OF QUEEN^S THEOLOGICAL COLLEGE. 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION. 

ILLUSTRATED PAMPHLET. 

EXAMINATION PAPERS IN ARTS, SCIENCE AND MEDICINE. 
(10 cents for each paper.) 

DIRECTORY OF GRADUATES IN ALL FACULTIES, January 1930. 
25 cents.